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Migración internacional y escolaridad como medios alternativos de movilidad social: el caso de México

Author

Listed:
  • Liliana Meza González

    (Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de México)

  • Liliana Meza González

    (Universidad Iberoamericana)

  • Carla Pederzini Villarreal

    (Universidad Iberoamericana)

Abstract

Using a simultaneous equation system between migration, remittances and two schooling variables, this papers analyses the effect the migration experience have on school attendance and years of schooling of youngsters between 11 and 19 years of age in the Mexican rural sector. The equations control for the effect the public conditioned transfers program Oportunidades may have on schooling, and the results suggest migration exposure at the home and the community level have negative incidence on schooling variables, despite the increase in income it causes.

Suggested Citation

  • Liliana Meza González & Liliana Meza González & Carla Pederzini Villarreal, 2009. "Migración internacional y escolaridad como medios alternativos de movilidad social: el caso de México," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 0(Special i), pages 163-206.
  • Handle: RePEc:emx:esteco:v:-:y:2009:i:special:p:163-206
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    File URL: http://estudioseconomicos.colmex.mx/archivo/EENumeroExtraordinario2009/163-206.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Emmanuel Skoufias & Susan Wendy Parker, 2001. "Conditional Cash Transfers and Their Impact on Child Work and Schooling: Evidence from the PROGRESA Program in Mexico," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2001), pages 45-96, August.
    2. Taylor, J Edward & Rozelle, Scott & de Brauw, Alan, 2003. "Migration and Incomes in Source Communities: A New Economics of Migration Perspective from China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(1), pages 75-101, October.
    3. Borraz Fernando, 2005. "Assessing the Impact of Remittances on Schooling: the Mexican Experience," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-32, April.
    4. David McKenzie & Hillel Rapoport, 2006. "Migration and Education Inequality in Rural Mexico," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 2657, Inter-American Development Bank.
    5. Lucas, Robert E B, 1987. "Emigration to South Africa's Mines," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 313-330, June.
    6. David McKenzie & Hillel Rapoport, 2006. "Can Migration Reduce Educational Attainments? Depressing Evidence from Mexico," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0601, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mora Rivera, José Jorge. & Arellano-González, Jesús., 2012. "Migration and Remittances Effects on Consumption of the Poorest : the Mexican Case," Panorama Económico, Escuela Superior de Economía, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, vol. 0(14), pages 121-163, primer se.
    2. Javier Arias & Oliver Azuara & Pedro Bernal & James J. Heckman & Cajeme Villarreal, 2010. "Policies To Promote Growth and Economic Efficiency in Mexico," NBER Working Papers 16554, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Lara, Jaime, 2015. "International migration and human capital in Mexico: Networks or parental absence?," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 131-142.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    schooling; migration; poverty.;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution

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