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Meat demand in China


  • David L. Ortega
  • H. Holly Wang
  • James S. Eales


Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a thorough analysis of meat demand in China and predict future trends in meat consumption. Design/methodology/approach - Expenditure as well as Marshallian and Hicksian demand elasticities of various meats in China are evaluated using the linear almost ideal demand system. Findings - Results from this paper show that pork, the primary meat in Chinese diets, has become a necessity and that poultry, beef, mutton, and fish are considered luxuries within the meat budget allocation of Chinese households. Furthermore, the results predict that for any increase in future meat expenditure, the largest share of that increase will be allocated to pork consumption. Originality/value - This paper fills a gap currently present in the empirical literature regarding time series meat demand analysis in China. This paper makes use of newly available time series data on Chinese meat consumption and prices to estimate expenditure as well as own-price and cross-price elasticities. Implications for both domestic meat producers and grain exporters are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • David L. Ortega & H. Holly Wang & James S. Eales, 2009. "Meat demand in China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 1(4), pages 410-419, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:caerpp:v:1:y:2009:i:4:p:410-419

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
    5. Theodore W. Schultz, 1960. "Capital Formation by Education," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 68, pages 571-571.
    6. Razin, Assaf & Yuen, Chi-Wa, 1997. "Factor Mobility and Income Growth: Two Convergence Hypotheses," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 1(2), pages 171-190, June.
    7. Costas Azariadis & Allan Drazen, 1990. "Threshold Externalities in Economic Development," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(2), pages 501-526.
    8. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    9. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jing You, 2014. "Dietary change, nutrient transition and food security in fast-growing China," Chapters,in: Handbook on Food, chapter 9, pages 204-245 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Zhao, Jing & Thompson, Wyatt, 2013. "The Effect of Refrigerator Use on Meat Consumption in Rural China," 2013 Annual Meeting, February 2-5, 2013, Orlando, Florida 142931, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    3. Ortega, David L. & Wang, H. Holly & Wu, Laping & Olynk, Nicole J., 2011. "Modeling heterogeneity in consumer preferences for select food safety attributes in China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 318-324, April.
    4. Masuda, Tadayoshi & Goldsmith, Peter D., 2012. "China's Meat and Egg Production and Soybean Meal Demand for Feed: An Elasticity Analysis and Long-Term Projections," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 15(3).
    5. repec:eee:enepol:v:113:y:2018:i:c:p:633-642 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Qingbin Wang & Robert Parsons & Guangxuan Zhang, 2010. "China's dairy markets: trends, disparities, and implications for trade," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(3), pages 356-371, September.
    7. Chen, Maolong & Ortega, David. L & Wang, H.Holly, 2015. "Chinese consumers' perception of imported versus domestic pork quality," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205328, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.

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    Meat; Demand; Consumption; China;


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