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Culture's consequences for emotional attending during cross-border acquisition implementation

  • Reus, Taco H.
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    Building on psychology research about culture's influences on emotional expressions and experiences, I considered culture's consequences for acquirers’ emotional attending during post-merger integration. Analyses of cross-border acquisitions by multinational companies from the United States showed support for a subtle role of culture – on the one hand, cultural differences constrain emotional attending during post-merger integration; on the other hand, when acquisitions are made in cultures that are characterized by more humane orientation, U.S. acquirers seem to adapt to this local context and showed more emotional attending than in less humane-oriented cultures. The findings further suggest that these effects depend on an acquirer's multiculturalism.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1090951611000617
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of World Business.

    Volume (Year): 47 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 342-351

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:worbus:v:47:y:2012:i:3:p:342-351
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    1. Taco H Reus & Bruce T Lamont, 2009. "The double-edged sword of cultural distance in international acquisitions," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 40(8), pages 1298-1316, October.
    2. Empson, Laura, 2004. "Organizational identity change: managerial regulation and member identification in an accounting firm acquisition," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 29(8), pages 759-781, November.
    3. Piero Morosini & Scott Shane & Harbir Singh, 1998. "National Cultural Distance and Cross-Border Acquisition Performance," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 29(1), pages 137-158, March.
    4. Oded Shenkar, 2001. "Cultural Distance Revisited: Towards a More Rigorous Conceptualization and Measurement of Cultural Differences," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 32(3), pages 519-535, September.
    5. Ingmar Bj�rkman & G�nter K Stahl & Eero Vaara, 2007. "Cultural differences and capability transfer in cross-border acquisitions: the mediating roles of capability complementarity, absorptive capacity, and social integration," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 38(4), pages 658-672, July.
    6. Russ Vince, 2006. "Being Taken Over: Managers' Emotions and Rationalizations During a Company Takeover," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(2), pages 343-365, 03.
    7. Kwok Leung & Rabi S Bhagat & Nancy R Buchan & Miriam Erez & Cristina B Gibson, 2005. "Culture and international business: recent advances and their implications for future research," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 36(4), pages 357-378, July.
    8. Yaakov Weber & Oded Shenkar & Adi Raveh, 1996. "National and Corporate Cultural Fit in Mergers/Acquisitions: An Exploratory Study," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 42(8), pages 1215-1227, August.
    9. Roberto A. Weber & Colin F. Camerer, 2003. "Cultural Conflict and Merger Failure: An Experimental Approach," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 49(4), pages 400-415, April.
    10. Bruce Kogut & Harbir Singh, 1988. "The Effect of National Culture on the Choice of Entry Mode," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 19(3), pages 411-432, September.
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