IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/wodepe/v22y2021ics2452292921000242.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The mobile money’s poverty-reducing promise: Evidence from Cambodia

Author

Listed:
  • Seng, Kimty

Abstract

Fin-tech platforms such as mobile money services are likely to have a potential to promote socio-economic development in the developing world. Recently, the arguments about the poverty-alleviating promise of mobile money have been controversial and inconclusive. This article analyses the effects of mobile money on household poverty in terms of household income per capita in Cambodia by using an endogenous switching model with data from the Cambodia FinScope Consumer Survey conducted in 2015. A complementary analysis of the effects on domestic remittances is performed to give more insights into the potential effects by adopting an endogenous switching probit model. The results suggest that households taking up mobile money services are likely to enjoy higher household income per capita, with the complementary results illustrating that the uptake of mobile money services is likely to increase the likelihood that households receive domestic remittances. Accounting for financial literacy through its interaction with the uptake of mobile money services, the results reveal that the effects are likely greater if the household users are headed by financially-literate persons.

Suggested Citation

  • Seng, Kimty, 2021. "The mobile money’s poverty-reducing promise: Evidence from Cambodia," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 22(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wodepe:v:22:y:2021:i:c:s2452292921000242
    DOI: 10.1016/j.wdp.2021.100310
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2452292921000242
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1016/j.wdp.2021.100310?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Grohmann, Antonia & Klühs, Theres & Menkhoff, Lukas, 2018. "Does financial literacy improve financial inclusion? Cross country evidence," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 84-96.
    2. Morgan, Peter J. & Trinh, Long Q., 2019. "Fintech and Financial Literacy in the Lao PDR," ADBI Working Papers 933, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    3. Jenny Aker, Rachid Boumnijel, Amanda McClelland, and Niall Tierney, 2011. "Zap It to Me: The Short-Term Impacts of a Mobile Cash Transfer Program - Working Paper 268," Working Papers 268, Center for Global Development.
    4. Wantchekon, Leonard & Riaz, Zara, 2019. "Mobile technology and food access," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 344-356.
    5. Keisuke Hirano & Guido W. Imbens & Geert Ridder, 2003. "Efficient Estimation of Average Treatment Effects Using the Estimated Propensity Score," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(4), pages 1161-1189, July.
    6. James Heckman & Justin L. Tobias & Edward Vytlacil, 2001. "Four Parameters of Interest in the Evaluation of Social Programs," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 68(2), pages 210-223, October.
    7. Salvatore Di Falco & Marcella Veronesi & Mahmud Yesuf, 2011. "Does Adaptation to Climate Change Provide Food Security? A Micro-Perspective from Ethiopia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 93(3), pages 825-842.
    8. Michael Lokshin & Zurab Sajaia, 2004. "Maximum likelihood estimation of endogenous switching regression models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(3), pages 282-289, September.
    9. Shawn Cole & Thomas Sampson & Bilal Zia, 2011. "Prices or Knowledge? What Drives Demand for Financial Services in Emerging Markets?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(6), pages 1933-1967, December.
    10. Maryann Bylander, 2015. "Credit as Coping: Rethinking Microcredit in the Cambodian Context," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(4), pages 533-553, December.
    11. Pascaline Dupas & Jonathan Robinson, 2013. "Savings Constraints and Microenterprise Development: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 163-192, January.
    12. Maddala, G.S., 1986. "Disequilibrium, self-selection, and switching models," Handbook of Econometrics, in: Z. Griliches† & M. D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 28, pages 1633-1688, Elsevier.
    13. Imai, Katsushi S. & Arun, Thankom & Annim, Samuel Kobina, 2010. "Microfinance and Household Poverty Reduction: New Evidence from India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(12), pages 1760-1774, December.
    14. Batista, Catia & Vicente, Pedro C., 2020. "Improving access to savings through mobile money: Experimental evidence from African smallholder farmers," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 129(C).
    15. James Heckman & Justin L. Tobias & Edward Vytlacil, 2001. "Four Parameters of Interest in the Evaluation of Social Programs," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 68(2), pages 210-223, October.
    16. Isaac Mbiti & David N. Weil, 2015. "Mobile Banking: The Impact of M-Pesa in Kenya," NBER Chapters, in: African Successes, Volume III: Modernization and Development, pages 247-293, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Munyegera, Ggombe Kasim & Matsumoto, Tomoya, 2016. "Mobile Money, Remittances, and Household Welfare: Panel Evidence from Rural Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 127-137.
    18. Milford Bateman & Maren Duvendack & Nicholas Loubere, 2019. "Is fin-tech the new panacea for poverty alleviation and local development? Contesting Suri and Jack’s M-Pesa findings published in Science," Review of African Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(161), pages 480-495, July.
    19. Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2007. "Inverse probability weighted estimation for general missing data problems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 141(2), pages 1281-1301, December.
    20. Chang, Hung-Hao & Mishra, Ashok, 2008. "Impact of off-farm labor supply on food expenditures of the farm household," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 657-664, December.
    21. Kimty Seng, 2018. "Revisiting Microcredit's Poverty†Reducing Promise: Evidence from Cambodia," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(4), pages 615-642, May.
    22. Abhijit Banerjee & Dean Karlan & Jonathan Zinman, 2015. "Six Randomized Evaluations of Microcredit: Introduction and Further Steps," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 1-21, January.
    23. Aakvik, Arild & Heckman, James J. & Vytlacil, Edward J., 2005. "Estimating treatment effects for discrete outcomes when responses to treatment vary: an application to Norwegian vocational rehabilitation programs," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 15-51.
    24. Michael Lokshin & Zurab Sajaia, 2011. "Impact of interventions on discrete outcomes: Maximum likelihood estimation of the binary choice models with binary endogenous regressors," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 11(3), pages 368-385, September.
    25. Ignacio Mas & Olga Morawczynski, 2009. "Designing Mobile Money Services Lessons from M-PESA," Innovations: Technology, Governance, Globalization, MIT Press, vol. 4(2), pages 77-91, April.
    26. David W. Carter & J. Walter Milon, 2005. "Price Knowledge in Household Demand for Utility Services," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(2).
    27. N'dri, Lasme Mathieu & Kakinaka, Makoto, 2020. "Financial inclusion, mobile money, and individual welfare: The case of Burkina Faso," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(3).
    28. Jenny C. Aker & Rachid Boumnijel & Amanda McClelland & Niall Tierney, 2016. "Payment Mechanisms and Antipoverty Programs: Evidence from a Mobile Money Cash Transfer Experiment in Niger," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(1), pages 1-37.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Seng, Kimty, 2019. "The Poverty-Reducing Effects of Financial Inclusion: Evidence from Cambodia," MPRA Paper 95726, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 26 Aug 2019.
    2. Tesfaye, Wondimagegn & Tirivayi, Nyasha, 2018. "The impacts of postharvest storage innovations on food security and welfare in Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 52-67.
    3. Benali, Marwan & Brümmer, Bernhard & Afari-Sefa, Victor, 2017. "Small producer participation in export vegetable supply chains and poverty: evidence from different export schemes in Tanzania," GlobalFood Discussion Papers 262583, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    4. Ky, Serge Stéphane & Rugemintwari, Clovis & Sauviat, Alain, 2021. "Friends or Foes? Mobile money interaction with formal and informal finance," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(1).
    5. Yonas Alem & Håkan Eggert & Remidius Ruhinduka, 2015. "Improving Welfare Through Climate-Friendly Agriculture: The Case of the System of Rice Intensification," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 62(2), pages 243-263, October.
    6. Salvatore Falco & Marcella Veronesi, 2018. "Managing Environmental Risk in Presence of Climate Change: The Role of Adaptation in the Nile Basin of Ethiopia," Natural Resource Management and Policy, in: Leslie Lipper & Nancy McCarthy & David Zilberman & Solomon Asfaw & Giacomo Branca (ed.), Climate Smart Agriculture, pages 497-526, Springer.
    7. N'dri, Lasme Mathieu & Kakinaka, Makoto, 2020. "Financial inclusion, mobile money, and individual welfare: The case of Burkina Faso," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(3).
    8. Yang, Jinqiu & Hong, Yongmiao & Ma, Shuangge, 2016. "Impact of the new health care reform on hospital expenditure in China: A case study from a pilot city," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 1-14.
    9. Doris Läpple & Thia Hennessy & Carol Newman, 2013. "Quantifying the Economic Return to Participatory Extension Programmes in Ireland: an Endogenous Switching Regression Analysis," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(2), pages 467-482, June.
    10. Benali, M. & Bruemmer, B. & Afari-Sefa, V., 2018. "Small producer participation in export vegetable supply chains and poverty: evidence from different export schemes in Tanzania," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277131, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    11. Asfaw, Solomon & Shiferaw, Bekele & Simtowe, Franklin & Lipper, Leslie, 2012. "Impact of modern agricultural technologies on smallholder welfare: Evidence from Tanzania and Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 283-295.
    12. Singh, Nirvikar, 2018. "Financial Inclusion: Concepts, Issues and Policies for India," MPRA Paper 91047, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Kassie, Menale & Teklewolde, Hailemariam & Erenstein, Olaf & Jaleta, Moti & Marenya, Paswel & Mekurai, Mulugetta, 2015. "Technology diversification: Assessing impacts on crop income and agrochemical uses in Malawi," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211838, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    14. Akpalu, Wisdom & Zhang, Xu, 2014. "Fast-food consumption and child body mass index in China: Application of an endogenous switching regression model," WIDER Working Paper Series 139, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    15. Julius Manda & Cornelis Gardebroek & Makaiko Khonje & Arega Alene & Munyaradzi Mutenje & Menale Kassie, 2016. "Determinants of child nutritional status in the eastern province of Zambia: the role of improved maize varieties," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(1), pages 239-253, February.
    16. Salvatore Di Falco & Marcella Veronesi & Mahmud Yesuf, 2011. "Does Adaptation to Climate Change Provide Food Security? A Micro-Perspective from Ethiopia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 93(3), pages 825-842.
    17. Bairagi, Subir & Mishra, Ashok K. & Durand-Morat, Alvaro, 2020. "Climate risk management strategies and food security: Evidence from Cambodian rice farmers," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 95(C).
    18. Kumar, Anjani & Saroj, Sunil & Joshi, P.K. & Takeshima, Hiroyuki, 2018. "Does cooperative membership improve household welfare? Evidence from a panel data analysis of smallholder dairy farmers in Bihar, India," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 24-36.
    19. Abdisa, Lamessa T., 2019. "Firm Performance Under Infrastructure Constraints: Evodence from Sub-sahara African Firms," MPRA Paper 95758, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Emiliano Magrini & Mauro Vigani, 2016. "Technology adoption and the multiple dimensions of food security: the case of maize in Tanzania," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(4), pages 707-726, August.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:wodepe:v:22:y:2021:i:c:s2452292921000242. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/world-development-perspectives .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/world-development-perspectives .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.