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Cash transfers for sustainable rural livelihoods? Examining the long-term productive effects of the Child Support Grant in South Africa

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Listed:
  • Hajdu, Flora
  • Granlund, Stefan
  • Neves, David
  • Hochfeld, Tessa
  • Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
  • Sandström, Emil

Abstract

Cash transfers have received increased scholarly and policy attention, as a means of reducing poverty in the global South. While cash transfers are primarily intended to prevent impoverishment and deprivation, several studies suggest they can have 'productive' impacts, contributing to building sustainable livelihoods. However, pilot projects of unconditional cash transfers have often been too brief or too recent to determine how small, but regular, transfers can improve rural livelihoods over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Hajdu, Flora & Granlund, Stefan & Neves, David & Hochfeld, Tessa & Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin & Sandström, Emil, 2020. "Cash transfers for sustainable rural livelihoods? Examining the long-term productive effects of the Child Support Grant in South Africa," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 19(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wodepe:v:19:y:2020:i:c:s2452292920300497
    DOI: 10.1016/j.wdp.2020.100227
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    References listed on IDEAS

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