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Asking Questions to Understand Rural Livelihoods: Comparing Disaggregated vs. Aggregated Approaches to Household Livelihood Questionnaires

Listed author(s):
  • Jagger, Pamela
  • Luckert, Marty K.
  • Banana, Abwoli
  • Bahati, Joseph

This study tests the hypothesis that both disaggregated and aggregated data collection methods produce similar estimates of the relative importance of livelihood portfolio activities and expenditures. The results show that different methods of data collection yield substantively different estimates of livelihood strategies for two indicators: income and expenditure. We also find evidence of a seasonal bias in responses to household livelihood questions asked at higher levels of aggregation. Our findings highlight the challenge of designing household surveys to elicit accurate and precise information, and demonstrate that different methods of data collection influence our understanding of rural livelihoods.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305750X12001003
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 40 (2012)
Issue (Month): 9 ()
Pages: 1810-1823

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:40:y:2012:i:9:p:1810-1823
DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2012.04.030
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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  1. Frank Ellis & H Ade Freeman, 2004. "Rural Livelihoods and Poverty Reduction Strategies in Four African Countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(4), pages 1-30.
  2. Fisher, Monica & Reimer, Jeffrey J. & Carr, Edward R., 2010. "Who Should be Interviewed in Surveys of Household Income?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 966-973, July.
  3. Davis, Jennifer & Whittington, Dale, 1998. ""Participatory" Research for Development Projects: A Comparison of the Community Meeting and Household Survey Techniques," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(1), pages 73-94, October.
  4. Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Pender, John L. & Jagger, Pamela & Sserunkuuma, Dick & Kaizzi, Crammer & Ssali, Henry, 2004. "Strategies for sustainable land management and poverty reduction in Uganda:," Research reports 133, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Anirudh Krishna & Patti Kristjanson & Maren Radeny & Wilson Nindo, 2004. "Escaping Poverty and Becoming Poor in 20 Kenyan Villages," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 211-226.
  6. Stefan Dercon, 2002. "Income Risk, Coping Strategies, and Safety Nets," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 17(2), pages 141-166, September.
  7. Cavendish, William, 2000. "Empirical Regularities in the Poverty-Environment Relationship of Rural Households: Evidence from Zimbabwe," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(11), pages 1979-2003, November.
  8. Menton, Mary C.S. & Lawrence, Anna & Merry, Frank & Brown, Nick D., 2010. "Estimating natural resource harvests: Conjectures?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(6), pages 1330-1335, April.
  9. Chambers, Robert, 1994. "The origins and practice of participatory rural appraisal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(7), pages 953-969, July.
  10. Sjaastad, Espen & Angelsen, Arild & Vedeld, Pål & Bojö, Jan, 2005. "What is environmental income?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 37-46, October.
  11. Subhrendu K. Pattanayak & Erin O. Sills, 2001. "Do Tropical Forests Provide Natural Insurance? The Microeconomics of Non-Timber Forest Product Collection in the Brazilian Amazon," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 77(4), pages 595-612.
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