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Pastoralists' Conceptions of Poverty: An Analysis of Traditional and Conventional Indicators from Borana, Ethiopia

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  • Tache, Boku
  • Sjaastad, Espen

Abstract

Summary We examine the traditional wealth ranking system of Borana pastoralists in Ethiopia. We investigate the proximity of conventional poverty indicators to the traditional rankings, revealing the relative lack of proximity of income and expenditure indicators. An examination of the poverty rates generated by different indicators and poverty lines reveals that conventional measures produce poverty rates that are significantly higher than traditional rankings and measures based on herd size. Poverty diagnosis among pastoralists such as the Borana, in order to generate appropriate prescriptions, should to a greater extent rely on asset-based indicators; these should ideally be complemented by qualitative approaches.

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  • Tache, Boku & Sjaastad, Espen, 2010. "Pastoralists' Conceptions of Poverty: An Analysis of Traditional and Conventional Indicators from Borana, Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 1168-1178, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:38:y:2010:i:8:p:1168-1178
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    1. Dika, Galgalo & Tolossa, Degefa & Eyana, Shiferaw Muleta, 2021. "Multidimensional poverty of pastoralists and implications for policy in Boorana rangeland system, Southern Ethiopia," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 21(C).
    2. Megersa, Bekele & Markemann, André & Angassa, Ayana & Ogutu, Joseph O. & Piepho, Hans-Peter & Valle Zaráte, Anne, 2014. "Impacts of climate change and variability on cattle production in southern Ethiopia: Perceptions and empirical evidence," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 23-34.
    3. M. Aufderheide & C. Voigts & C. Hülsebusch & B. Kaufmann, 2013. "Decent work? How self-employed pastoralists and employed herders on ranches perceive their working conditions," ICDD Working Papers 7, University of Kassel, Fachbereich Gesellschaftswissenschaften (Social Sciences), Internatioanl Center for Development and Decent Work (ICDD).
    4. Garenne, Michel, 2015. "Traditional Wealth, Modern Goods, and Demographic Behavior in Rural Senegal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 267-276.

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