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Does the commute mode affect the frequency of walking behavior? The public transit link

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  • Lachapelle, Ugo
  • Noland, Robert B.

Abstract

The mode used to travel to work and how frequently an individual walks for all purposes is examined. Commuting by public transit, in particular, is hypothesized to lead to more overall walking, relative to commuting with a car. A statewide computer assisted telephone survey in New Jersey (n=530) was used to collect information on the mode usually used for the commute, the frequency of walking for all purposes, socio-demographic characteristics and neighborhood indicators of the presence of destinations within a 10min walk. Ordered probit models of the frequency of walk trips were estimated. Respectively, 63% and 68%, of those commuting by transit and walking or bicycling report walking at least once a day. Public transit commuters walked more frequently for all purposes than car commuters; and almost as frequently as those walking to work. There were significant differences in walking frequency between transit modes (bus vs. train/subway/light rail) and non-significant differences between transit access mode (walking vs. park-and-ride). Working from home was not associated with more frequent walking. The time that a transit user spent walking to transit stations or stops was on average slightly shorter than the time spent walking during a journey to work by walking. Walking more to access neighborhood destinations seemed to account for this higher frequency of walking in transit users. Transit service and neighborhood destinations may be complementary in supporting increased walking activity and transit use.

Suggested Citation

  • Lachapelle, Ugo & Noland, Robert B., 2012. "Does the commute mode affect the frequency of walking behavior? The public transit link," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 26-36.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:21:y:2012:i:c:p:26-36
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2012.01.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chandra, Shailesh & Bari, Muhammad Ehsanul & Devarasetty, Prem Chand & Vadali, Sharada, 2013. "Accessibility evaluations of feeder transit services," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 47-63.
    2. Sheila Ferrer & Tomás Ruiz, 2017. "Comparison on travel scheduling between driving and walking trips by habitual car users," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 27-48, January.
    3. Andy Hong & Marlon G. Boarnet & Doug Houston, 2013. "Does light rail transit increase physical activity?," Working Paper 9212, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    4. William Michelson & Ugo Lachapelle, 2016. "Patterns of Walking Among Employed, Urban Canadians: Variations by Commuting Mode, Time of Day, and Days of the Week," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 11(4), pages 1321-1340, December.
    5. Werner, Carol M. & Brown, Barbara B. & Tribby, Calvin P. & Tharp, Doug & Flick, Kristi & Miller, Harvey J. & Smith, Ken R. & Jensen, Wyatt, 2016. "Evaluating the attractiveness of a new light rail extension: Testing simple change and displacement change hypotheses," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 15-23.
    6. Kenneth Joh & Sandip Chakrabarti & Marlon G. Boarnet & Ayoung Woo, 2015. "The Walking Renaissance: A Longitudinal Analysis of Walking Travel in the Greater Los Angeles Area, USA," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(7), pages 1-27, July.
    7. Simons, Dorien & Clarys, Peter & De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse & de Geus, Bas & Vandelanotte, Corneel & Deforche, Benedicte, 2014. "Why do young adults choose different transport modes? A focus group study," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 151-159.
    8. Hong, Andy & Boarnet, Marlon G. & Houston, Douglas, 2016. "New light rail transit and active travel: A longitudinal study," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 131-144.

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