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Conceptualising convenience: Transportation practices and perceptions of inner-urban high density residents in Brisbane, Australia

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  • Buys, Laurie
  • Miller, Evonne

Abstract

High-density living in inner-urban areas has been promoted to encourage the use of more sustainable modes of travel to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, previous research presents mixed results on the relationship between living in proximity to transport systems and reduced car-dependency. This research examines inner-city residents' transportation practices and perceptions, via 24 qualitative interviews with residents from high-density dwellings in inner-city Brisbane, Australia. Whilst participants consider public transport accessible and convenient, car use continues to be relied on for many journeys. Transportation choices are justified through complex definitions of convenience containing both utilitarian and psycho-social elements, with three key themes identified: time-efficiency, single versus multi-modal trips, and distance to and purpose of journey, as well as attitudinal, affective and symbolic elements related to transport mode use. Understanding conceptions of transport convenience held by different segments of the transport users market, alongside other factors strongly implicated in travel mode choice, can ensure targeted improvements in sustainable transport service levels and infrastructure as well as information service provision and behavioural change campaigns.

Suggested Citation

  • Buys, Laurie & Miller, Evonne, 2011. "Conceptualising convenience: Transportation practices and perceptions of inner-urban high density residents in Brisbane, Australia," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 289-297, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:18:y:2011:i:1:p:289-297
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Dacko, Scott G. & Spalteholz, Carolin, 2014. "Upgrading the city: Enabling intermodal travel behaviour," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 222-235.
    2. Falkmer, Marita & Barnett, Tania & Horlin, Chiara & Falkmer, Olov & Siljehav, Jessica & Fristedt, Sofi & Lee, Hoe C. & Chee, Derserri Y. & Wretstrand, Anders & Falkmer, Torbjörn, 2015. "Viewpoints of adults with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders on public transport," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 163-183.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:6:p:1043-:d:101740 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Clauss, Thomas & Döppe, Sebastian, 2016. "Why do urban travelers select multimodal travel options: A repertory grid analysis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 93-116.

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