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Introducing multitasking to the study of travel and ICT: Examining its extent and assessing its potential importance

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  • Kenyon, Susan
  • Lyons, Glenn

Abstract

Personal travel is undertaken principally as a means of access. The Internet now provides an additional form of access, enabling many activities to be reached without recourse to physical mobility by the individual undertaking the activity. However, the social and transport effects of this 'virtual mobility' are uncertain. Here, it is argued that the incidence and properties of multitasking are a necessary part of the assessment of such impacts. Participation in activities and, thus, change in activity participation will not be fully measured without consideration of multitasking. This paper presents a review, empirical evidence and discussion to support this hypothesis. Emergent from an examination of the literature and examined by new empirical evidence are three observations: (1) failure to consider multitasking leads to the underreporting of key activities; (2) misrepresentation of activity participation tends to be more pronounced for certain groups; (3) lack of awareness of multitasking could lead to flawed measurement and misrepresentation of behaviour change. Further to these observations, study findings suggest that multitasking behaviour varies according to whether the primary activity is being undertaken online or offline. Thus, the consideration of multitasking is likely to have important implications for the study of travel, Internet use and interactions between the two.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenyon, Susan & Lyons, Glenn, 2007. "Introducing multitasking to the study of travel and ICT: Examining its extent and assessing its potential importance," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 161-175, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:41:y:2007:i:2:p:161-175
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    1. repec:eee:transb:v:106:y:2017:i:c:p:153-172 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Antonio Páez & Steven Farber, 2012. "Participation and desire: leisure activities among Canadian adults with disabilities," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(6), pages 1055-1078, November.
    3. Pawlak, Jacek & Polak, John W. & Sivakumar, Aruna, 2015. "Towards a microeconomic framework for modelling the joint choice of activity–travel behaviour and ICT use," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 92-112.
    4. Román, Concepción & Martín, Juan Carlos & Espino, Raquel & Cherchi, Elisabetta & Ortúzar, Juan de Dios & Rizzi, Luis Ignacio & González, Rosa Marina & Amador, Francisco Javier, 2014. "Valuation of travel time savings for intercity travel: The Madrid-Barcelona corridor," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 105-117.
    5. Nobuaki Ohmori & Noboru Harata, 2008. "How Different Are Activities While Commuting By Train? A Case In Tokyo," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 99(5), pages 547-561, December.
    6. Aguiléra, Anne & Guillot, Caroline & Rallet, Alain, 2012. "Mobile ICTs and physical mobility: Review and research agenda," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 664-672.
    7. Akar, Gulsah & Clifton, Kelly J. & Doherty, Sean T., 2012. "Redefining activity types: Who participates in which leisure activity?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(8), pages 1194-1204.
    8. Bertil Vilhelmson & Eva Thulin, 2008. "Virtual Mobility, Time Use And The Place Of The Home," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 99(5), pages 602-618, December.
    9. Carlton Basmajian, 2010. "“Turn on the radio, bust out a song”: the experience of driving to work," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 59-84, January.
    10. Steven Farber & Antonio Páez & Ruben Mercado & Matthew Roorda & Catherine Morency, 2011. "A time-use investigation of shopping participation in three Canadian cities: is there evidence of social exclusion?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 17-44, January.
    11. Christian Licoppe & Dana Diminescu & Zbigniew Smoreda & Cezary Ziemlicki, 2008. "Using mobile phone geolocalisation for 'socio-geographical' analysis of co-ordination, urban mobilities, and social integration patterns," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 99(5), pages 584-601, December.
    12. Luis Miranda-Moreno & Naveen Eluru & Martin Lee-Gosselin & Tyler Kreider, 2012. "Impact of ICT access on personal activity space and greenhouse gas production: evidence from Quebec City, Canada," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(5), pages 895-918, September.
    13. Tim Schwanen & Martin Dijst & Mei-Po Kwan, 2008. "Icts And The Decoupling Of Everyday Activities, Space And Time: Introduction," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 99(5), pages 519-527, December.
    14. Christa Hubers & Tim Schwanen & Martin Dijst, 2008. "Ict And Temporal Fragmentation Of Activities: An Analytical Framework And Initial Empirical Findings," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 99(5), pages 528-546, December.
    15. Lyons, Glenn & Jain , Juliet & Susilo , Yusak O. & Atkins, Steve, 2013. "Comparing rail passengers’ travel time use in Great Britain between 2004 and 2010," Working papers in Transport Economics 2013:17, CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI).
    16. Konstadinos G. Goulias & Ram M. Pendyala, 2014. "Choice context," Chapters,in: Handbook of Choice Modelling, chapter 5, pages 101-130 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    17. Steven Farber & Antonio Páez, 2010. "Employment status and commute distance of Canadians with disabilities," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(6), pages 931-952, November.
    18. Zhi Dong & Patricia Mokhtarian & Giovanni Circella & James Allison, 2015. "The estimation of changes in rail ridership through an onboard survey: did free Wi-Fi make a difference to Amtrak’s Capitol Corridor service?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 123-142, January.

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