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Early childhood economic disadvantage and the health of Hispanic children

  • Schmeer, Kammi K.
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    This research provides a longitudinal view of early childhood economic deprivation and its associations with health among young Hispanic children born in the United States. Of additional interest is whether economic deprivation is associated with child health similarly across all Hispanic children or whether associations differ by maternal nativity or country of origin. Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing data and multinomial logistic regression are used to estimate the effects of total years in poverty, material hardship, and lack of health insurance on Hispanic children's health status at age 5 and change in health status between ages 1 and 5. Results show that multiple measures of early childhood economic deprivation have additive negative associations with Hispanic child health, and that living more years in poverty is associated with declining health status among young Hispanic children. Interaction effects indicate that early childhood poverty has stronger associations with lower age 5 health status and declining health between ages 1 and 5 for children with foreign-born Hispanic mothers than for those with native-born Hispanic mothers. No differences were found in the associations between economic deprivation and child health by maternal country of origin. These results suggest an important role of economic resources for protecting Hispanic child health, and that poor Hispanic children with immigrant mothers may be at particularly high risk of developing health problems as they move out of infancy and into early childhood.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953612004704
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 75 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 8 ()
    Pages: 1523-1530

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:75:y:2012:i:8:p:1523-1530
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    1. Anne Case & Darren Lubotsky & Christina Paxson, 2002. "Economic Status and Health in Childhood: The Origins of the Gradient," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1308-1334, December.
    2. Robert Hummer & Daniel Powers & Starling Pullum & Ginger Gossman & W. Frisbie, 2007. "Paradox found (again): Infant mortality among the Mexican-origin population in the united states," Demography, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 441-457, August.
    3. Reichman, Nancy E. & Teitler, Julien O. & Garfinkel, Irwin & McLanahan, Sara S., 2001. "Fragile Families: sample and design," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 303-326.
    4. Erin Hamilton & Jodi Berger Cardoso & Robert Hummer & Yolanda C. Padilla, 2011. "Assimilation and emerging health disparities among new generations of U.S. children," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(25), pages 783-818, December.
    5. Gerry Redmond & Ilan Katz, 2009. "Review of the Circumstances among Children in Iimmigrant Families in Australia," Innocenti Working Papers inwopa573, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
    6. Abraído-Lanza, Ana F. & Chao, Maria T. & Flórez, Karen R., 2005. "Do healthy behaviors decline with greater acculturation?: Implications for the Latino mortality paradox," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 61(6), pages 1243-1255, September.
    7. Erin R. Hamilton & Robert A. Hummer & Xiuhong H. You & Yolanda C. Padilla, 2006. "Health Insurance and Health-Care Utilization of U.S.-Born Mexican-American Children," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 87(s1), pages 1280-1294.
    8. Anne Case & Angela Fertig & Christina Paxson, 2004. "The Lasting Impact of Childhood Health and Circumstance," Working Papers 246, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
    9. Hunt, L.M.Linda M. & Schneider, Suzanne & Comer, Brendon, 2004. "Should "acculturation" be a variable in health research? A critical review of research on US Hispanics," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 59(5), pages 973-986, September.
    10. Yolanda C. Padilla & Erin R. Hamilton & Robert A. Hummer, 2009. "Beyond the Epidemiological Paradox: The Health of Mexican-American Children at Age Five," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1072-1088.
    11. Erin R. Hamilton & Robert A. Hummer & Xiuhong H. You & Yolanda C. Padilla, 2006. "Health Insurance and Health-Care Utilization of U.S.-Born Mexican-American Children," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 87(5), pages 1280-1294.
    12. Alberto Palloni, 2006. "Reproducing inequalities: Luck, wallets, and the enduring effects of childhood health," Demography, Springer, vol. 43(4), pages 587-615, November.
    13. Bzostek, Sharon H. & Beck, Audrey N., 2011. "Familial instability and young children's physical health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 282-292, July.
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