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Assimilation and emerging health disparities among new generations of U.S. children

Author

Listed:
  • Erin R. Hamilton

    (University of California, Davis)

  • Jodi Berger Cardoso

    (University of Texas at Austin)

  • Robert Hummer

    (University of Texas at Austin)

  • Yolanda C. Padilla

    (University of Texas at Austin)

Abstract

This article shows that the prevalence of four common child health conditions increases across generations (from first-generation immigrant children to second-generation U.S.-born children of immigrants to third-and-higher-generation children) within each of four major U.S. racial/ethnic groups. In the third-plus generation, black and Hispanic children have higher rates of nearly all conditions. Health care, socioeconomic status, parents’ health, social support, and neighborhood conditions influence child health and help explain third-and-higher-generation racial/ethnic disparities. However, these factors do not explain the generational pattern. The generational pattern may reflect cohort changes, selective ethnic attrition, unhealthy assimilation, or changing responses to survey questions among immigrant groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Erin R. Hamilton & Jodi Berger Cardoso & Robert Hummer & Yolanda C. Padilla, 2011. "Assimilation and emerging health disparities among new generations of U.S. children," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(25), pages 783-818, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:25:y:2011:i:25
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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol25/25/25-25.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2006.100974_7 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Guillermina Jasso & Douglas S. Massey & Mark R. Rosenzweig & James P. Smith, 2004. "Immigrant Health--Selectivity and Acculturation," Labor and Demography 0412002, EconWPA.
    3. Heather Antecol & Kelly Bedard, 2006. "Unhealthy assimilation: Why do immigrants converge to American health status levels?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(2), pages 337-360, May.
    4. Angel, Ronald & Guarnaccia, Peter J., 1989. "Mind, body, and culture: Somatization among Hispanics," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 28(12), pages 1229-1238, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Joan Costa-i-Font & Azusa Sato, 2016. "'Cultural Persistence' of Health Capital: Evidence from European Migrants," CESifo Working Paper Series 5964, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Schmeer, Kammi K., 2012. "Early childhood economic disadvantage and the health of Hispanic children," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(8), pages 1523-1530.
    3. Cardoso, Jodi Berger & Dettlaff, Alan J. & Finno-Velasquez, Megan & Scott, Jennifer & Faulkner, Monica, 2014. "Nativity and immigration status among Latino families involved in the child welfare system: Characteristics, risk, and maltreatment," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 189-200.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    assimilation; child health; disparities; immigration; race/ethnicity;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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