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Neighborhood social capital and crime victimization: Comparison of spatial regression analysis and hierarchical regression analysis

Author

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  • Takagi, Daisuke
  • Ikeda, Ken’ichi
  • Kawachi, Ichiro

Abstract

Crime is an important determinant of public health outcomes, including quality of life, mental well-being, and health behavior. A body of research has documented the association between community social capital and crime victimization. The association between social capital and crime victimization has been examined at multiple levels of spatial aggregation, ranging from entire countries, to states, metropolitan areas, counties, and neighborhoods. In multilevel analysis, the spatial boundaries at level 2 are most often drawn from administrative boundaries (e.g. Census tracts in the U.S.). One problem with adopting administrative definitions of neighborhoods is that it ignores spatial spillover. We conducted a study of social capital and crime victimization in one ward of Tokyo city, using a Spatial Durbin Model with an inverse-distance weighting matrix that assigned each respondent a unique level of “exposure” to social capital based on all other residents’ perceptions. The study is based on a postal questionnaire sent to 20–69 years old residents of Arakawa Ward, Tokyo. The response rate was 43.7%. We examined the contextual influence of generalized trust, perceptions of reciprocity, two types of social network variables, as well as two principal components of social capital (constructed from the above four variables). Our outcome measure was self-reported crime victimization in the last five years. In the Spatial Durbin Model, we found that neighborhood generalized trust, reciprocity, supportive networks and two principal components of social capital were each inversely associated with crime victimization. By contrast, a multilevel regression performed with the same data (using administrative neighborhood boundaries) found generally null associations between neighborhood social capital and crime. Spatial regression methods may be more appropriate for investigating the contextual influence of social capital in homogeneous cultural settings such as Japan.

Suggested Citation

  • Takagi, Daisuke & Ikeda, Ken’ichi & Kawachi, Ichiro, 2012. "Neighborhood social capital and crime victimization: Comparison of spatial regression analysis and hierarchical regression analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(10), pages 1895-1902.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:75:y:2012:i:10:p:1895-1902 DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.07.039
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jay Weiser & Ronald Neath, 2016. "Private Ordering, Social Cohesion and Value: Residential Community Association Covenant Enforcement," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 19(1), pages 1-26.
    2. Riumallo-Herl, Carlos Javier & Kawachi, Ichiro & Avendano, Mauricio, 2014. "Social capital, mental health and biomarkers in Chile: Assessing the effects of social capital in a middle-income country," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 47-58.
    3. repec:eee:socmed:v:190:y:2017:i:c:p:92-100 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Dean, Lorraine T. & Hillier, Amy & Chau-Glendinning, Hang & Subramanian, S.V. & Williams, David R. & Kawachi, Ichiro, 2015. "Can you party your way to better health? A propensity score analysis of block parties and health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 201-209.
    5. Luciano Lavecchia, 2015. "A note on social capital, space and growth in Europe," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1017, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    6. repec:eee:socmed:v:194:y:2017:i:c:p:105-127 is not listed on IDEAS

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