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Educational mismatch and health status among foreign-born workers in Sweden

Author

Listed:
  • Dunlavy, A.C.
  • Garcy, A.M.
  • Rostila, M.

Abstract

Foreign-born workers have been shown to experience poorer working conditions than native-born workers. Yet relationships between health and educational mismatch have been largely overlooked among foreign-born workers. This study uses objective and self-reported measures of educational mismatch to compare the prevalence of educational mismatch among native (n = 2359) and foreign-born (n = 1789) workers in Sweden and to examine associations between educational mismatch and poor self-rated health. Findings from weighted multivariate logistic regression which controlled for social position and individual-level demographic characteristics suggested that over-educated foreign-born workers had greater odds ratios for poor-self rated health compared to native-born matched workers. This association was particularly evident among men (OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.04–4.39) and women (OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 1.12–4.03) from countries outside of Western Europe, North America, and Australia/New Zealand. Associations between under-education and poor-self rated health were also found among women from countries outside of Western Europe, North America, and Australia/New Zealand (OR = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.27–3.18). These findings suggest that educational mismatch may be an important work-related social determinant of health among foreign-born workers. Future studies are needed to examine the effects of long-term versus short-term states of educational mismatch on health and to study relationships over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Dunlavy, A.C. & Garcy, A.M. & Rostila, M., 2016. "Educational mismatch and health status among foreign-born workers in Sweden," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 36-44.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:154:y:2016:i:c:p:36-44
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.02.018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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