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Social capital renewal and the academic performance of international students in Australia

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  • Neri, Frank
  • Ville, Simon

Abstract

Many believe that social capital fosters the accumulation of human capital. Yet international university students arrive in their host country generally denuded of social capital and confronted by unfamiliar cultural and educational institutions. This study investigates how, and to what extent, international students renew their social networks, and whether such investments are positively associated with academic performance. We adopt a social capital framework and conduct a survey of international students at a typical Australian university in order to categorise and measure investments in social capital renewal, and test a multivariate model of academic performance that includes social capital variables, amongst others, as regressors. Our survey results reveal a high degree of variability in social capital investment across students and, amongst the more active, a tendency to build close networks in the main with students from their own country of origin. Our empirical results suggest that such investments are not associated with improved academic performance but are associated with increased well being.

Suggested Citation

  • Neri, Frank & Ville, Simon, 2008. "Social capital renewal and the academic performance of international students in Australia," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1515-1538, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:37:y:2008:i:4:p:1515-1538
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Terrence Casey & Kevin Christ, 2005. "Social Capital and Economic Performance in the American States," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 86(4), pages 826-845.
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    6. R. Quentin Grafton & Stephen Knowles & P. Dorian Owen, 2004. "Total Factor Productivity, Per Capita Income and Social Divergence," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(250), pages 302-313, September.
    7. Beugelsdijk, Sjoerd & van Schaik, Ton, 2005. "Social capital and growth in European regions: an empirical test," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 301-324, June.
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    9. DARREN McKAY & DONALD E. LEWIS, 1995. "Domestic Economic Impact Of Exporting Education: A Case Study Of The University Of Wollongong," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 14(1), pages 28-39, March.
    10. Beaulieua, Lionel J. & Israel, Glenn D. & Hartless, Glen & Dyk, Patricia, 2001. "For whom does the school bell toll?: Multi-contextual presence of social capital and student educational achievement," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 121-127, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marina Murat, 2014. "Soft, hard or smart power? International students and investments abroad," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 107, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    2. Marina Murat, 2013. "Education ties and investments abroad. Empirical evidence from the US and UK," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 091, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    3. Marina Murat, 2014. "Soft, hard or smart power? International students and investments abroad," Department of Economics 0043, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    4. Rodrigo Martín-Rojas & Virginia Fernández-Pérez & Encarnación García-Sánchez, 0. "Encouraging organizational performance through the influence of technological distinctive competencies on components of corporate entrepreneurship," International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-30.
    5. repec:spr:intemj:v:13:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11365-016-0406-7 is not listed on IDEAS

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