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The impacts of telecommuting in Dublin

Author

Listed:
  • O'Keefe, Paul
  • Caulfield, Brian
  • Brazil, William
  • White, Peter

Abstract

Telecommuting has been perceived as an effective means of reducing commuter related trips, travel time and emissions. Previously, the lack of access to broadband Internet connection and teleconferencing software from home has acted as a barrier to telecommuting regularly or at all. However, with advances in information and communication technology in recent years telecommuting is becoming a viable option for employers and employees to undertake.

Suggested Citation

  • O'Keefe, Paul & Caulfield, Brian & Brazil, William & White, Peter, 2016. "The impacts of telecommuting in Dublin," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 13-20.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:retrec:v:57:y:2016:i:c:p:13-20
    DOI: 10.1016/j.retrec.2016.06.010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fu, Miao & Andrew Kelly, J. & Peter Clinch, J. & King, Fearghal, 2012. "Environmental policy implications of working from home: Modelling the impacts of land-use, infrastructure and socio-demographics," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 416-423.
    2. Sangho Choo & Patricia Mokhtarian & Ilan Salomon, 2005. "Does telecommuting reduce vehicle-miles traveled? An aggregate time series analysis for the U.S," Transportation, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 37-64, January.
    3. Walls, Margaret & Safirova, Elena, 2004. "A Review of the Literature on Telecommuting and Its Implications for Vehicle Travel and Emissions," Discussion Papers dp-04-44, Resources For the Future.
    4. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Bagley, Michael N. & Salomon, Ilan, 1998. "The Impact of Gender, Occupation, and Presence of Children on Telecommuting Motivations and Constraints," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt6792b1k7, University of California Transportation Center.
    5. Bayarma Alexander & Martin Dijst & Dick Ettema, 2010. "Working from 9 to 6? An analysis of in-home and out-of-home working schedules," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 505-523, May.
    6. Michael Hynes, 2014. "Telework Isn’t Working: A Policy Review," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 45(4), pages 579-602.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2018. "Telework, the Timing of Work, and Instantaneous Well-Being: Evidence from Time Use Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11271, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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    Keywords

    Telecommuting; Sustainable mobility;

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