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Thinking about technology: Applying a cognitive lens to technical change

  • Kaplan, Sarah
  • Tripsas, Mary
Registered author(s):

    We apply a cognitive lens to understanding technology trajectories across the life cycle by developing a co-evolutionary model of technological frames and technology. Applying that model to each stage of the technology life cycle, we identify conditions under which a cognitive lens might change the expected technological outcome predicted by purely economic or organizational models. We also show that interactions of producers, users and institutions shape the development of collective frames around the meaning of new technologies. We thus deepen our understanding of sources of variation in the era of ferment, conditions under which a dominant design may be achieved, the underlying architecture of the era of incremental change and the dynamics associated with discontinuities.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V77-4S6GRK5-2/1/7fc567bc86b826df36189bb6f3573de6
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research Policy.

    Volume (Year): 37 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 5 (June)
    Pages: 790-805

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:37:y:2008:i:5:p:790-805
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/respol

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