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Classifying technology policy from an evolutionary perspective

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  • Cantner, Uwe
  • Pyka, Andreas

Abstract

Asked for the most important driving forces of economic development, most economists do not hesitate to state, that it is technical progress which is the main source of quanti-ta-ti-ve and qualitative economic development generated in National Systems of Innovation (NSI). To classify and analyze NSI's the con-cepts of mission- and diffusion-oriented policy designs were introduced. Although, we suppose this taxonomy to be well suited to analyze techno-logy policy, it seems to us in its basic formulation somewhat crude, especially with respect to the supposed characteristics to assign a specific innovation system to the one or the other policy design. To surmount these shortcomings we develop a new classificatory scheme building on a questionnaire approach and suggesting four categories to spread out between the tech-nology and the economic side. This scheme allows for deeper insights and more evident com-pa-risons of different NSI's.
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Suggested Citation

  • Cantner, Uwe & Pyka, Andreas, 2001. "Classifying technology policy from an evolutionary perspective," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 759-775, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:30:y:2001:i:5:p:759-775
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cantner, Uwe & Pyka, Andreas, 1998. "Absorbing Technological Spillovers: Simulations in an Evolutionary Framework," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(2), pages 369-397, June.
    2. Justman, Moshe & Teubal, Morris, 1995. "Technological infrastructure policy (TIP): Creating capabilities and building markets," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 259-281, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lambert Koch & Marc Grünhagen, 2009. "The value of delays: market- and policy-induced adjustment processes as a motivating factor in dynamic entrepreneurship," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 19(5), pages 701-724, October.
    2. Andreas Pyka, 2014. "Avoiding evolutionary inefficiencies in innovation networks," Prometheus, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 265-279, September.
    3. Robert, Verónica & Yoguel, Gabriel, 2016. "Complexity paths in neo-Schumpeterian evolutionary economics, structural change and development policies," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 3-14.
    4. Rogge, Karoline S. & Reichardt, Kristin, 2016. "Policy mixes for sustainability transitions: An extended concept and framework for analysis," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(8), pages 1620-1635.
    5. Uwe Cantner & Simone Vannuccini, 2012. "A New View of General Purpose Technologies," Jena Economic Research Papers 2012-054, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    6. Yu, Jiang & Zhang, Yue & Gao, Ping, 2012. "Examining China's technology policies for wireless broadband infrastructure," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 847-857.
    7. Andreas Pyka & Uwe Cantner & Alfred Greiner & Thomas Kuhn (ed.), 2009. "Recent Advances in Neo-Schumpeterian Economics," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 12982, April.
    8. Mariana Mazzucato, 2015. "From Market Fixing to Market-Creating: A New Framework for Economic Policy," SPRU Working Paper Series 2015-25, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex.
    9. Autio, Erkko & Kanninen, Sami & Gustafsson, Robin, 2008. "First- and second-order additionality and learning outcomes in collaborative R&D programs," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 59-76, February.
    10. Christian Schubert, 2012. "Is novelty always a good thing? Towards an evolutionary welfare economics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 585-619, July.
    11. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:12:p:2253-:d:121843 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Lee, Kyungpyo & Lee, Sungjoo, 2013. "Patterns of technological innovation and evolution in the energy sector: A patent-based approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 415-432.
    13. Carlsson , Bo, 2016. "Industrial Dynamics: A Review of the Literature 1990-2009," Papers in Innovation Studies 2016/3, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
    14. Kurt Dopfer, 2013. "Evolutionary Economics," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2013-08, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    15. Knockaert, Mirjam & Spithoven, André & Clarysse, Bart, 2014. "The impact of technology intermediaries on firm cognitive capacity additionality," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 376-387.
    16. Mariana Mazzucato & Douglas K Robinson, 2016. "Lost in space? NASA and the changing publicprivate eco-system in space," SPRU Working Paper Series 2016-20, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex.
    17. van den Bergh, Jeroen C.J.M., 2008. "Optimal diversity: Increasing returns versus recombinant innovation," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(3-4), pages 565-580, December.
    18. repec:oup:oxford:v:33:y:2017:i:1:p:24-48. is not listed on IDEAS
    19. repec:oup:scippl:v:44:y:2017:i:5:p:620-630. is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Rogge, Karoline S. & Reichardt, Kristin, 2013. "Towards a more comprehensive policy mix conceptualization for environmental technological change: A literature synthesis," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S3/2013, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    21. Bodas Freitas, Isabel Maria & von Tunzelmann, Nick, 2008. "Mapping public support for innovation: A comparison of policy alignment in the UK and France," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1446-1464, October.
    22. Isabel Maria Freitas Bodas & Nick Von Tunzelmann, 2008. "Mapping public support for innovation: a comparison of policy alignment in the UK and France," Grenoble Ecole de Management (Post-Print) hal-01487464, HAL.
    23. Jeroen Bergh & Giorgos Kallis, 2013. "A survey of evolutionary policy: normative and positive dimensions," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 281-303, October.
    24. Kurt Dopfer, 2012. "The origins of meso economics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 133-160, January.
    25. Kurt Dopfer, 2011. "Economics in a Cultural Key: Complexity and Evolution Revisited," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology, chapter 14 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O39 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Other

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