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A review on global fuel economy standards, labels and technologies in the transportation sector

  • Atabani, A.E.
  • Badruddin, Irfan Anjum
  • Mekhilef, S.
  • Silitonga, A.S.
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    Globally, the transportation sector is the second largest energy consuming sector after the industrial sector and accounts for 30% of the world's total delivered energy. In 2008 the transportation sector accounted for about 22% of total world CO2 emissions. It is believed that this sector is currently responsible for nearly 60% of world oil demand. Within this sector, road vehicles dominate oil consumption and represents 81% of total transportation energy demand. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the possible opportunities to improve fuel economy and thus reduce global oil consumption and greenhouse gases. There are three measures that have been reviewed; passenger vehicle fuel economy and greenhouse gas emission standards, fuel economy labels and improvement in vehicle fuel efficiency by advanced technologies.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews.

    Volume (Year): 15 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 9 ()
    Pages: 4586-4610

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:15:y:2011:i:9:p:4586-4610
    DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2011.07.092
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    14. Wang, Zhao & Jin, Yuefu & Wang, Michael & Wei, Wu, 2010. "New fuel consumption standards for Chinese passenger vehicles and their effects on reductions of oil use and CO2 emissions of the Chinese passenger vehicle fleet," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 5242-5250, September.
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