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The systemic impact of a transition fuel: Does natural gas help or hinder the energy transition?

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  • Gürsan, C.
  • de Gooyert, V.

Abstract

In the Paris Agreement, many nations set ambitious global goals to stabilize and reduce carbon emissions to mitigate climate change. A large share of these emissions is caused by electricity production. Scientists have been debating the viability of using natural gas as a transition fuel while renewable energies mature technologically and economically. Although natural gas might help the energy transition by reducing emissions compared to coal, there are other long-term implications of investing in natural gas which can work against reaching climate goals. One concern is that investments in natural gas might crowd out investments in renewable alternatives.

Suggested Citation

  • Gürsan, C. & de Gooyert, V., 2021. "The systemic impact of a transition fuel: Does natural gas help or hinder the energy transition?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 138(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:138:y:2021:i:c:s1364032120308364
    DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2020.110552
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