IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

A partisan effect in the efficiency of the US stock market

  • Alvarez-Ramirez, J.
  • Rodriguez, E.
  • Espinosa-Paredes, G.
Registered author(s):

    This work examines the presence of a partisan effect in the US markets over different presidential periods. The analysis is based on the computation of the fractal scaling dynamics of the Dow Jones Industrial Average by means of the detrended fluctuation analysis. The results indicated the presence of several cycles with dominant periods ranging from a 4 to 12 years/cycle. It is argued that these periods are within the range for business cycles reported in the recent literature. On the other hand, it is found that over Democratic terms the stock market tends to deviate from de random walk behavior, which suggests important differences in the economic policies implemented by each political party.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only. Journal offers the option of making the article available online on Science direct for a fee of $3,000

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications.

    Volume (Year): 391 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 20 ()
    Pages: 4923-4932

    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:phsmap:v:391:y:2012:i:20:p:4923-4932
    Contact details of provider: Web page:

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Sachsida, Adolfo & Divino, Jose Angelo & Cajueiro, Daniel Oliveira, 2011. "Inflation, unemployment, and the time consistency of the US monetary policy," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 173-179, June.
    2. Stephen R Foerster & John J Schmitz, 1997. "The Transmission of U.S. Election Cycles to International Stock Returns," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 28(1), pages 1-27, March.
    3. Giglio, Ricardo & Matsushita, Raul & Figueiredo, Annibal & Gleria, Iram & Da Silva, Sergio, 2008. "Algorithmic complexity theory and the relative efficiency of financial markets - Updated," MPRA Paper 11150, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Snowberg, Erik & Wolfers, Justin & Zitzewitz, Eric, 2006. "Partisan Impacts on the Economy: Evidence from Prediction Markets and Close Elections," Research Papers 1928, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    5. Kian‐Ping Lim & Robert Brooks, 2011. "The Evolution Of Stock Market Efficiency Over Time: A Survey Of The Empirical Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 69-108, 02.
    6. Zunino, Luciano & Zanin, Massimiliano & Tabak, Benjamin M. & Pérez, Darío G. & Rosso, Osvaldo A., 2010. "Complexity-entropy causality plane: A useful approach to quantify the stock market inefficiency," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 389(9), pages 1891-1901.
    7. G. William Schwert, 1990. "Stock Returns and Real Activity: A Century of Evidence," NBER Working Papers 3296, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Rozeff, Michael S. & Kinney, William Jr., 1976. "Capital market seasonality: The case of stock returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 379-402, October.
    9. Wong, Wing-Keung & McAleer, Michael, 2009. "Mapping the Presidential Election Cycle in US stock markets," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 79(11), pages 3267-3277.
    10. Risso, Wiston Adrián, 2008. "The informational efficiency and the financial crashes," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 396-408, September.
    11. Aguiar-Conraria, Luís & Azevedo, Nuno & Soares, Maria Joana, 2008. "Using wavelets to decompose the time–frequency effects of monetary policy," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 387(12), pages 2863-2878.
    12. Ramazan Gencay & Nikola Gradojevic, 2009. "Crash of ’87 - Was it Expected? Aggregate Market Fears and Long Range Dependence," Working Paper Series 28_09, The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, revised Jan 2009.
    13. Liano, Kartono & Liano, Kadir & Manakyan, Herman, 1999. "Presidential administrations and the day-of-the-week effect in stock returns," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 93-99, June.
    14. French, Kenneth R., 1980. "Stock returns and the weekend effect," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 55-69, March.
    15. Giglio, Ricardo & Matsushita, Raul & Figueiredo, Annibal & Gleria, Iram & Da Silva, Sergio, 2008. "Algorithmic complexity theory and the relative efficiency of financial markets," MPRA Paper 8704, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Aggarwal, Raj & Schirm, David C., 1992. "The predictive power of January returns and the political-business cycle," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 237-245.
    17. Gartner, Manfred & Wellershoff, Klaus W., 1995. "Is there an election cycle in American stock returns?," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 387-410.
    18. Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose & Alvarez, Jesus & Rodriguez, Eduardo & Fernandez-Anaya, Guillermo, 2008. "Time-varying Hurst exponent for US stock markets," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 387(24), pages 6159-6169.
    19. Gibbons, Michael R & Hess, Patrick, 1981. "Day of the Week Effects and Asset Returns," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(4), pages 579-96, October.
    20. Cajueiro, Daniel O. & Tabak, Benjamin M., 2010. "Fluctuation dynamics in US interest rates and the role of monetary policy," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 163-169, September.
    21. Booth, James R. & Booth, Lena Chua, 2003. "Is presidential cycle in security returns merely a reflection of business conditions?," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 131-159.
    22. Keim, Donald B., 1983. "Size-related anomalies and stock return seasonality : Further empirical evidence," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 13-32, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:phsmap:v:391:y:2012:i:20:p:4923-4932. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.