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Human capital risk in life-cycle economies

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  • Singh, Aarti

Abstract

The aggregate effects of market incompleteness are studied in a model where agents face idiosyncratic, uninsurable human capital investment risk. Using a life-cycle model with a version of a Ben-Porath (1967) human capital accumulation technology, stationary equilibria of calibrated cases are analyzed in which risk arises from specialization risk and career risk. With career risk only, stationary equilibria resemble those studied by Aiyagari (1994), and the impact of uninsurable idiosyncratic risk is relatively small. With a significant amount of specialization risk, however, stationary equilibria are severely distorted, with human capital about 57 percent as large as its complete markets counterpart.

Suggested Citation

  • Singh, Aarti, 2010. "Human capital risk in life-cycle economies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(6), pages 729-738, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:57:y:2010:i:6:p:729-738
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    Cited by:

    1. Arpita Chatterjee & Aarti Singh & Tahlee Stone, 2016. "Understanding Wage Inequality in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(298), pages 348-360, September.
    2. Yena Park, 2014. "Constrained Efficiency in a Risky Human Capital Model," RCER Working Papers 585, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    3. Chih-Chin Ho & Ching-Yang Lin & Cheng-Tao Tang, 2013. "How Do Income and Bequest Taxes Affect Income Inequality? The Role of Parental Transfers," Working Papers EMS_2013_10, Research Institute, International University of Japan.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)

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