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Delaying integration of immigrant labor for the purpose of taxation


  • Richter, Wolfram F.


Delayed Integration ("DI") is a rule for taxing migrants. It requires that immigrants be taxed in the receiving country only after some period of transition. Conversely, emigrants are released from the obligation to pay home taxes only after a certain period. DI is an alternative to the Employment Principle and the Origin Principle. The former governs the international taxation of labor while a close substitute to the latter - the Nationality Principle - is underlying U.S. tax law. The paper studies the potential merits of DI in a setting which allows one to trade off the social cost of tax distortion and the social cost of wasteful government.
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Suggested Citation

  • Richter, Wolfram F., 2004. "Delaying integration of immigrant labor for the purpose of taxation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 597-613, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:55:y:2004:i:3:p:597-613

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Razin,Assaf & Sadka,Efraim, 2001. "Labor, Capital, and Finance," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521785570, March.
    2. Edwards, Jeremy & Keen, Michael, 1996. "Tax competition and Leviathan," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 113-134, January.
    3. Michel, Ph. & Pestieau, P. & Vidal, J. -P., 1998. "Labor migration and redistribution with alternative assimilation policies: The small economy case," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 363-377, May.
    4. David E. Wildasin, 2000. "Labor-Market Integration, Investment in Risky Human Capital, and Fiscal Competition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 73-95, March.
    5. Sinn, Hans-Werner, 1994. "How Much Europe? Subsidiarity, Centralization and Fiscal Competition," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 41(1), pages 85-107, February.
    6. Michael Rauscher, 2000. "Interjurisdictional Competition and Public-Sector Prodigality: The Triumph of the Market over the State?," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 57(1), pages 1-89, September.
    7. Wallace E. Oates, 2002. "Fiscal and Regulatory Competition: Theory and Evidence," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 3(4), pages 377-390, November.
    8. Michael Keen & David E. Wildasin, 2000. "Pareto Efficiency in International Taxation," CESifo Working Paper Series 371, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Edwards, Jeremy & Keen, Michael, 1996. "Tax competition and Leviathan," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 113-134, January.
    10. Pauly, Mark V., 1973. "Income redistribution as a local public good," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 35-58, February.
    11. Wolfram F. Richter, 2001. "Delayed Integration of Mobile Labor: A Principle for Coordinating Taxation, Social Security, and Social Assistance," CESifo Working Paper Series 624, CESifo Group Munich.
    12. Richter, Wolfram F., 2002. "Social Security and Taxation of Labour Subject to Subsidiarity and Freedom of Movement," IZA Discussion Papers 490, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Tim Krieger, 2014. "Public Pensions and Immigration," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(2), pages 10-15, 07.
    2. Alfons J. Weichenrieder & Oliver Busch, 2005. "Artificial Time Inconsistency as a Remedy for the Race to the Bottom (new title: Delayed Integration as a Possible Remedy for the Race to the Bottom)," CESifo Working Paper Series 1637, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Hans-Werner Sinn, 2004. "Migration, Social Standards and Replacement Incomes: How to Protect Low-income Workers in the Industrialized Countries Against the Forces of Globalization and Market Integration," NBER Working Papers 10798, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Vilen Lipatov & Alfons J. Weichenrieder, 2010. "Optimal Income Taxation with Tax Competition," CESifo Working Paper Series 3108, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Vilen Lipatov & Alfons Weichenrieder, 2015. "Welfare and labor supply implications of tax competition for mobile labor," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 45(2), pages 457-477, September.
    6. Hans-Werner Sinn, 2005. "Migration and Social Replacement Incomes: How to Protect Low-Income Workers in the Industrialized Countries Against the Forces of Globalization and Market Integration," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 12(4), pages 375-393, August.
    7. Weichenrieder, Alfons J. & Busch, Oliver, 2007. "Delayed integration as a possible remedy for the race to the bottom," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 565-575, May.
    8. repec:ces:ifodic:v:12:y:2014:i:2:p:19116205 is not listed on IDEAS

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