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Social security incentives, human capital investment and mobility of labor

  • Poutvaara, Panu

Migration between countries with earnings-related and flat-rate pay-as-you-go social security systems may change human capital investments in both countries. The possibility of emigration boosts investments in human capital in the country with flat-rate benefits. Correspondingly, those expecting to migrate from the country with earnings-related benefits to a country with flat-rate benefits may reduce their investment in education. Allowing for migration may generate an intertemporal Pareto-improvement with cross-border transfers, and the contribution rates satisfying certain conditions. However, these conditions are not satisfied with those contribution rates that would arise if the governments maximize the welfare of their citizens without migration.

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Paper provided by University of Munich, Department of Economics in its series Munich Reprints in Economics with number 19804.

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Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Journal of Public Economics 7-8 91(2007): pp. 1299-1325
Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:19804
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  1. Bhagwati, Jagdish & Hamada, Koichi, 1974. "The brain drain, international integration of markets for professionals and unemployment : A theoretical analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 19-42, April.
  2. Richard Disney, 2004. "Are contributions to public pension programmes a tax on employment?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 19(39), pages 267-311, 07.
  3. Breyer, Friedrich & Kolmar, Martin, 2002. "Are national pension systems efficient if labor is (im)perfectly mobile?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(3), pages 347-374, March.
  4. Justman, M. & Thisse, J.-F., . "Implications of the mobility of skilled labor for local public funding of higher education," CORE Discussion Papers RP -1296, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  5. Marko Koethenbuerger & Panu Poutvaara & Paola Profeta, 2005. "Why are More Redistributive Social Security Systems Smaller? A Median Voter Approach," CESifo Working Paper Series 1397, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Mountford, Andrew, 1997. "Can a brain drain be good for growth in the source economy?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 287-303, August.
  7. Sinn, Hans-Werner, 1993. "How Much Europe? Subsidiarity, Centralization and Fiscal Competition," CEPR Discussion Papers 834, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Morten I. Lau & Panu Poutvaara, 2001. "Social Security Incentives and Human Capital Investment," CESifo Working Paper Series 438, CESifo Group Munich.
  9. Sinn, Hans-Werner & Uebelmesser, Silke, 2003. "Pensions and the path to gerontocracy in Germany," Munich Reprints in Economics 19563, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  10. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1997. "A Brain Gain with a Brain Drain," Economics Series 45, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  11. Cremer, H. & Pestieau, P., 2001. "Social insurance competition between Bismarck and Beveridge," CORE Discussion Papers 2001031, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  12. Stefan Homburg & Wolfram Richter, 1993. "Harmonizing public debt and public pension schemes in the European community," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 51-63, December.
  13. Svend E. Hougaard Jensen & Morten I. Lau & Panu Poutvaara, 2004. "Efficiency and Equity Aspects of Alternative Social Security Rules," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 60(3), pages 325-, September.
  14. Richter, Wolfram F., 2002. "Social Security and Taxation of Labour Subject to Subsidiarity and Freedom of Movement," IZA Discussion Papers 490, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. Konrad, Kai A, 1995. "Social Security and Strategic Inter-vivos Transfers of Social Capital," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 315-26, August.
  16. David E. Wildasin, 2000. "Labor-Market Integration, Investment in Risky Human Capital, and Fiscal Competition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 73-95, March.
  17. Browning, Edgar K, 1975. "Why the Social Insurance Budget Is Too Large in a Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 13(3), pages 373-88, September.
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