IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jpolmo/v34y2012i1p64-80.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Interest rate pass-through in Portugal: Interactions, asymmetries and heterogeneities

Author

Listed:
  • Rocha, Manuel Duarte

Abstract

This study looks at and finds interactions—between lending, deposit, and interbank rates—and asymmetries in interactions, in the pass-through to retail bank interest rates in Portugal. We uncover heterogeneous adjustments of bank rates as between sectors, between loans and deposits, and across maturities—which include complete long-run pass-through to corporate lending rates but rigidities for the personal sector, and incomplete long-run adjustment of deposit rates which also adjust asymmetrically. The results shed new light into understanding the behaviour of banks and the transmission mechanism of monetary policy, which is of value to future policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Rocha, Manuel Duarte, 2012. "Interest rate pass-through in Portugal: Interactions, asymmetries and heterogeneities," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 64-80.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:34:y:2012:i:1:p:64-80 DOI: 10.1016/j.jpolmod.2011.07.010
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0161893811000664
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gabe J. de Bondt, 2005. "Interest Rate Pass-Through: Empirical Results for the Euro Area," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 6(1), pages 37-78, February.
    2. Egert, Balazs & Crespo-Cuaresma, Jesus & Reininger, Thomas, 2007. "Interest rate pass-through in central and Eastern Europe: Reborn from ashes merely to pass away?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 209-225.
    3. Fried, Joel & Howitt, Peter, 1980. "Credit Rationing and Implicit Contract Theory," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 12(3), pages 471-487, August.
    4. Angeliki Kourelis & Carlo Cottarelli, 1994. "Financial Structure, Bank Lending Rates, and the Transmission Mechanism of Monetary Policy," IMF Working Papers 94/39, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Paul Klemperer, 1987. "Markets with Consumer Switching Costs," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 102(2), pages 375-394.
    6. Mester, Loretta J. & Saunders, Anthony, 1995. "When does the prime rate change?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 743-764, August.
    7. Sarno, Lucio & Thornton, Daniel L., 2003. "The dynamic relationship between the federal funds rate and the Treasury bill rate: An empirical investigation," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1079-1110, June.
    8. Claudio E. V. Borio & Wilhelm Fritz, 1995. "The response of short-term bank lending rates to policy rates: a cross-country perspective," BIS Working Papers 27, Bank for International Settlements.
    9. David Neumark & Steven A. Sharpe, 1992. "Market Structure and the Nature of Price Rigidity: Evidence from the Market for Consumer Deposits," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 657-680.
    10. Sander, Harald & Kleimeier, Stefanie, 2004. "Convergence in euro-zone retail banking? What interest rate pass-through tells us about monetary policy transmission, competition and integration," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, pages 461-492.
    11. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
    12. Osterwald-Lenum, Michael, 1992. "A Note with Quantiles of the Asymptotic Distribution of the Maximum Likelihood Cointegration Rank Test Statistics," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 54(3), pages 461-472, August.
    13. Barry Scholnick, 1999. "Interest Rate Asymmetries in Long-Term Loan and Deposit Markets," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 16(1), pages 5-26, September.
    14. Lim, G C, 2001. "Bank Interest Rate Adjustments: Are They Asymmetric?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 77(237), pages 135-147, June.
    15. Klemperer, Paul D, 1987. "Entry Deterrence in Markets with Consumer Switching Costs," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388a), pages 99-117, Supplemen.
    16. Johansen, Soren, 1995. "Likelihood-Based Inference in Cointegrated Vector Autoregressive Models," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774501.
    17. Carlo Cottarelli & Angeliki Kourelis, 1994. "Financial Structure, Bank Lending Rates, and the Transmission Mechanism of Monetary Policy," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 41(4), pages 587-623, December.
    18. Hannan, Timothy H & Berger, Allen N, 1991. "The Rigidity of Prices: Evidence from the Banking Industry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 938-945, September.
    19. Chionis, Dionysios P. & Leon, Costas A., 2006. "Interest rate transmission in Greece: Did EMU cause a structural break?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 453-466, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Camarero, Mariam & D'Adamo, Gaetano & Tamarit, Cecilio, 2014. "Wage leadership models: A country-by-country analysis of the EMU," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, pages 2-11.
    2. Perera, Anil & Wickramanayake, J., 2016. "Determinants of commercial bank retail interest rate adjustments: Evidence from a panel data model," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-20.
    3. Marcin Kacperczyk & Jaromir B. Nosal & Luminita Stevens, 2014. "Investor Sophistication and Capital Income Inequality," NBER Working Papers 20246, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Havranek, Tomas & Irsova, Zuzana & Lesanovska, Jitka, 2016. "Bank efficiency and interest rate pass-through: Evidence from Czech loan products," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 153-169.
    5. Avouyi-Dovi, S. & Horny, G. & Sevestre, P., 2017. "The stability of short-term interest rates pass-through in the euro area during the financial market and sovereign debt crises," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 74-94.
    6. Andries, Natalia & Billon, Steve, 2016. "Retail bank interest rate pass-through in the euro area: An empirical survey," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 170-194.
    7. Muhammad, Omer & de Haan, Jakob & Scholtens, Bert, 2014. "Impact of Interbank Liquidity on Monetary Transmission Mechanism: A Case Study of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 56161, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Aurélien Leroy & Yannick Lucotte, 2015. "Structural and cyclical determinants of bank interest rate pass-through in Eurozone," NBP Working Papers 198, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    9. Aristei, David & Gallo, Manuela, 2014. "Interest rate pass-through in the Euro area during the financial crisis: A multivariate regime-switching approach," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, pages 273-295.
    10. Holmes, Mark J. & Iregui, Ana María & Otero, Jesús, 2015. "Interest rate pass through and asymmetries in retail deposit and lending rates: An analysis using data from Colombian banks," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 270-277.
    11. Dilem Yildirim, 2012. "Interest Rate Pass-Through to Turkish Lending Rates: A Threshold Cointegration Analysis," ERC Working Papers 1207, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Sep 2012.
    12. repec:dau:papers:123456789/15030 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Interest rate pass-through; Bank interest rates; Transmission mechanism of monetary policy; Asymmetric adjustment; Portugal;

    JEL classification:

    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:34:y:2012:i:1:p:64-80. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505735 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.