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Joint non-OPEC carbon taxes and the transfer of OPEC monopoly rents

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  • Dong, Yan
  • Whalley, John

Abstract

Carbon taxes have largely been discussed as individual country measures (even if taken simultaneously) aimed to reduce carbon emissions, slow global warning, and internalizing the externalities associated with carbon generating activities, such as power generation. There has however been little emphasis on the incentives for subgroups of countries to jointly peruse carbon taxes. Yet for large importers of oil such as the US, the EU and China, their incentive is clearly to act together and have their taxes partly or wholly borne by oil exporters given this incentives. This paper discusses the potential for joint OECD (or non-OPEC) carbon taxes to reduce OPEC's monopoly rent and provide benefits to non-OPEC countries provided jointly agreed trigger strategies are adhered to enforce mutual cooperation. To this end, we develop a multi-region general equilibrium structure with an endogenously determined oil supply by OPEC in which both emissions and energy prices are endogenously determined. Our results suggest that jointly enacted carbon taxes by the US, the EU and China can be heavily borne by oil exporters; they reduce the welfare of OPEC and increase the welfare of non-OPEC countries. These carbon taxes reduce global emissions, but the effect is small.

Suggested Citation

  • Dong, Yan & Whalley, John, 2012. "Joint non-OPEC carbon taxes and the transfer of OPEC monopoly rents," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 49-63.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:34:y:2012:i:1:p:49-63
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jpolmod.2011.08.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Gago & Xavier Labandeira & Xiral López Otero, 2014. "A Panorama on Energy Taxes and Green Tax Reforms," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 208(1), pages 145-190, March.
    2. Nanthakumar, Loganathan & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Taha, Roshaiza, 2014. "The Effect of Green Taxation and Economic Growth on Environment Hazards: The Case of Malaysia," MPRA Paper 56843, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 23 Jun 2014.
    3. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-494 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Boeters, Stefan & Bollen, Johannes, 2012. "Fossil fuel supply, leakage and the effectiveness of border measures in climate policy," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S2), pages 181-189.
    5. Loganathan, Nanthakumar & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Taha, Roshaiza, 2014. "The link between green taxation and economic growth on CO2 emissions: Fresh evidence from Malaysia," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 1083-1091.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Carbon tax; non-OPEC; Monopoly rent; Global warming; Carbon emissions;

    JEL classification:

    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • D42 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Monopoly

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