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When does procedural fairness promote organizational citizenship behavior? Integrating empowering leadership types in relational justice models

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  • van Dijke, Marius
  • De Cremer, David
  • Mayer, David M.
  • Van Quaquebeke, Niels

Abstract

We examined how procedural fairness interacts with empowering leadership to promote employee OCB. We focused on two core empowering leadership types—encouraging self-development and encouraging independent action. An experiment revealed that leaders encouraging self-development made employees desire status information more (i.e., information regarding one’s value to the organization). Conversely, leaders encouraging independent action decreased employees’ desire for this type of information. Subsequently, a multisource field study (with a US and German sample) showed that encouraging self-development strengthened the relationship between procedural fairness and employee OCB, and this relationship was mediated by employees’ self-perceived status. Conversely, encouraging independent action weakened the procedural fairness-OCB relationship, as mediated by self-perceived status. This research integrates empowering leadership styles into relational fairness theories, highlighting that multiple leader behaviors should be examined in concert and that empowering leadership can have unintended consequences.

Suggested Citation

  • van Dijke, Marius & De Cremer, David & Mayer, David M. & Van Quaquebeke, Niels, 2012. "When does procedural fairness promote organizational citizenship behavior? Integrating empowering leadership types in relational justice models," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 117(2), pages 235-248.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:117:y:2012:i:2:p:235-248
    DOI: 10.1016/j.obhdp.2011.10.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tyler, Tom R. & Blader, Steven L., 2002. "Autonomous vs. comparative status: Must we be better than others to feel good about ourselves?," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 813-838, September.
    2. Evans, Martin G., 1985. "A Monte Carlo study of the effects of correlated method variance in moderated multiple regression analysis," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 305-323, December.
    3. Greenberg, Jerald, 2009. "Everybody Talks About Organizational Justice, But Nobody Does Anything About It," Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(02), pages 181-195, June.
    4. Cohen-Charash, Yochi & Spector, Paul E., 2001. "The Role of Justice in Organizations: A Meta-Analysis," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 278-321, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. van Dijke, Marius & Wildschut, Tim & Leunissen, Joost M. & Sedikides, Constantine, 2015. "Nostalgia buffers the negative impact of low procedural justice on cooperation," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 15-29.

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