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How suspicion mitigates the effect of influence tactics

  • Oza, Shweta S.
  • Srivastava, Joydeep
  • Koukova, Nevena T.
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    This research examines the role of suspicion in moderating the effect of psychological factors on satisfaction with bargaining outcomes. A suspicious mindset is induced by activating persuasion knowledge or the extent to which bargainers have knowledge about a psychological factor and recognize its potential persuasive influence. The results of four studies suggest that while time taken by an opponent to respond (Studies 1A and 1B), opponent providing a reference price that frames the outcome as a gain (Study 2), and opponent expressing unhappiness with an outcome (Study 3) increase satisfaction with bargaining outcome when bargainers' persuasion knowledge is not activated, these factors are rendered ineffective in increasing satisfaction when persuasion knowledge is activated. This research activates persuasion knowledge in three different ways (through priming, altering opponent's description, and providing an opportunity for gaming) and demonstrates that it is sufficient to induce a suspicious mindset that allows the associated defense mechanisms and coping strategies to guard against influence tactics.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WP2-4XYB41C-2/2/14dd9bf27358b05c010480510bf8c755
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

    Volume (Year): 112 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 1 (May)
    Pages: 1-10

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:112:y:2010:i:1:p:1-10
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/obhdp

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    1. Joydeep Srivastava & Shweta Oza, 2006. "Effect of Response Time on Perceptions of Bargaining Outcomes," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 266-272, 07.
    2. Kopelman, Shirli & Rosette, Ashleigh Shelby & Thompson, Leigh, 2006. "The three faces of Eve: Strategic displays of positive, negative, and neutral emotions in negotiations," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 81-101, January.
    3. Eduardo B. Andrade & Teck-Hua Ho, 2009. "Gaming Emotions in Social Interactions," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(4), pages 539-552, December.
    4. Kahneman, Daniel, 1992. "Reference points, anchors, norms, and mixed feelings," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 296-312, March.
    5. Joydeep Srivastava & Dipankar Chakravarti & Amnon Rapoport, 2000. "Price and Margin Negotiations in Marketing Channels: An Experimental Study of Sequential Bargaining Under One-sided Uncertainty and Opportunity Cost of Delay," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 19(2), pages 163-184, October.
    6. Srivastava, Joydeep, 2001. "The Role of Inferences in Sequential Bargaining with One-Sided Incomplete Information: Some Experimental Evidence," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 85(1), pages 166-187, May.
    7. White, Sally Blount & Valley, Kathleen L. & Bazerman, Max H. & Neale, Margaret A. & Peck, Sharon R., 1994. "Alternative Models of Price Behavior in Dyadic Negotiations: Market Prices, Reservation Prices, and Negotiator Aspirations," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 430-447, March.
    8. Novemsky, Nathan & Schweitzer, Maurice E., 2004. "What makes negotiators happy? The differential effects of internal and external social comparisons on negotiator satisfaction," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 186-197, November.
    9. Friestad, Marian & Wright, Peter, 1994. " The Persuasion Knowledge Model: How People Cope with Persuasion Attempts," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-31, June.
    10. Barry, Bruce & Oliver, Richard L., 1996. "Affect in Dyadic Negotiation: A Model and Propositions," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 127-143, August.
    11. Oliver, Richard L. & Balakrishnan, P. V. (Sundar) & Barry, Bruce, 1994. "Outcome Satisfaction in Negotiation: A Test of Expectancy Disconfirmation," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 252-275, November.
    12. White, Sally Blount & Neale, Margaret A., 1994. "The Role of Negotiator Aspirations and Settlement Expectancies in Bargaining Outcomes," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 303-317, February.
    13. Kristensen, Henrik & Garling, Tommy, 1997. "The Effects of Anchor Points and Reference Points on Negotiation Process and Outcome," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 85-94, July.
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