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Coping with challenge and hindrance stressors in teams: Behavioral, cognitive, and affective outcomes

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  • Pearsall, Matthew J.
  • Ellis, Aleksander P.J.
  • Stein, Jordan H.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to utilize the challenge-hindrance framework to examine the discrete and combined effects of different environmental stressors on behavioral, cognitive, and affective outcomes at the team level. Results from 83 teams working on a command and control simulation indicated that the introduction of a challenge stressor positively affected team performance and transactive memory. The introduction of a hindrance stressor negatively affected team performance and transactive memory and positively affected psychological withdrawal. When the hindrance stressor was combined with the challenge stressor, teams exhibited the lowest levels of performance and transactive memory, and the highest levels of psychological withdrawal. These effects were due to the adoption of specific coping strategies by team members. Implications are discussed, as well as limitations and directions for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Pearsall, Matthew J. & Ellis, Aleksander P.J. & Stein, Jordan H., 2009. "Coping with challenge and hindrance stressors in teams: Behavioral, cognitive, and affective outcomes," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 109(1), pages 18-28, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:109:y:2009:i:1:p:18-28
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kyle Lewis, 2004. "Knowledge and Performance in Knowledge-Worker Teams: A Longitudinal Study of Transactive Memory Systems," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 50(11), pages 1519-1533, November.
    2. Jackson, Susan E. & Schuler, Randall S., 1985. "A meta-analysis and conceptual critique of research on role ambiguity and role conflict in work settings," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 16-78, August.
    3. Phillips, Jean M., 2001. "The Role of Decision Influence and Team Performance in Member Self-Efficacy, Withdrawal, Satisfaction with the Leader, and Willingness to Return," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 122-147, January.
    4. Drach-Zahavy, Anat & Erez, Miriam, 2002. "Challenge versus threat effects on the goal-performance relationship," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 667-682, July.
    5. Moreland, Richard L. & Myaskovsky, Larissa, 2000. "Exploring the Performance Benefits of Group Training: Transactive Memory or Improved Communication?," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 117-133, May.
    6. Mary E. Zellmer-Bruhn, 2003. "Interruptive Events and Team Knowledge Acquisition," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 49(4), pages 514-528, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rosen, Christopher C. & Hochwarter, Wayne A., 2014. "Looking back and falling further behind: The moderating role of rumination on the relationship between organizational politics and employee attitudes, well-being, and performance," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 124(2), pages 177-189.
    2. Hsee, Christopher K. & Shen, Luxi & Zhang, Shirley & Chen, Jingqiu & Zhang, Li, 2012. "Fate or fight: Exploring the hedonic costs of competition," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 119(2), pages 177-186.
    3. repec:eee:jbrese:v:84:y:2018:i:c:p:59-71 is not listed on IDEAS

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