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Household mobility in New York City's regulated rental housing market


  • Simmons-Mosley, Tammie X.
  • Malpezzi, Stephen


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  • Simmons-Mosley, Tammie X. & Malpezzi, Stephen, 2006. "Household mobility in New York City's regulated rental housing market," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 38-62, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhouse:v:15:y:2006:i:1:p:38-62

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ladd, Helen F & Ludwig, Jens, 1997. "Federal Housing Assistance, Residential Relocation, and Educational Opportunities: Evidence from Baltimore," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 272-277, May.
    2. Gyourko, Joseph & Linneman, Peter, 1990. "Measurement problems in quantifying the distributional effects of subsidy programs," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 19-33, July.
    3. Weinberg, Daniel H. & Friedman, Joseph & Mayo, Stephen K., 1981. "Intraurban residential mobility: The role of transactions costs, market imperfections, and household disequilibrium," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 332-348, May.
    4. Gyourko, Joseph & Linneman, Peter, 1989. "Equity and efficiency aspects of rent control: An empirical study of New York City," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 54-74, July.
    5. Stephen Malpezzi & Larry Ozanne & Thomas G. Thibodeau, 1987. "Microeconomic Estimates of Housing Depreciation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 63(4), pages 372-385.
    6. Stephen Malpezzi, 1993. "Can New York and Los Angeles Learn from Kumasi and Bangalore? A Comparison of Costs and Benefits of Rent Control," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 93-04, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
    7. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    8. Linneman, Peter, 1987. "The effect of rent control on the distribution of income among New York City renters," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 14-34, July.
    9. Olsen, Edgar O, 1972. "An Econometric Analysis of Rent Control," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(6), pages 1081-1100, Nov.-Dec..
    10. Katherine M. O'Regan & John M. Quigley, 1998. "Where Youth Live: Economic Effects of Urban Space on Employment Prospects," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 35(7), pages 1187-1205, June.
    11. Allen C. Goodman & Masahiro Kawai, 1985. "Length-of-Residence Discounts and Rental Housing Demand: Theory and Evidence," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 62(2), pages 93-105.
    12. Mayo, Stephen K., 1981. "Theory and estimation in the economics of housing demand," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 95-116, July.
    13. Munch, Jakob Roland & Svarer, Michael, 2002. "Rent control and tenancy duration," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 542-560, November.
    14. Roistacher, Elizabeth A., 1992. "Rent regulation in New York City: Simulating decontrol options," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 107-138, June.
    15. Marks, Denton, 1984. "The effects of partial-coverage rent control on the price and quantity of rental housing," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 360-369, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ashot Tsharakyan & Petr Zemčík, 2016. "Did rent deregulation alter tenure choice decisions in the Czech Republic?," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 24(2), pages 335-360, April.
    2. Heintzelman, Martin D. & Walsh, Patrick J. & Grzeskowiak, Dustin J., 2013. "Explaining the appearance and success of open space referenda," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 108-117.
    3. Mark A. C. Kattenberg & Wolter H. J. Hassink, 2017. "Who Moves Out of Social Housing? The Effect of Rent Control on Housing Tenure Choice," De Economist, Springer, vol. 165(1), pages 43-66, March.
    4. Cynthia Chen & Jason Chen, 2009. "What is responsible for the response lag of a significant change in discretionary time use: the built environment, family and social obligations, temporal constraints, or a psychological delay factor?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 27-46, January.

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