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Learning from private and public observations of othersʼ actions

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  • Amador, Manuel
  • Weill, Pierre-Olivier

Abstract

We study the diffusion of dispersed private information in a large economy, where agents learn from the actions of others through two channels: a public channel, such as equilibrium market prices, and a private channel, for example local interactions. We show that, when agents learn only from the public channel, an initial release of public information increases agentsʼ total knowledge at all times and increases welfare. When a private learning channel is present, this result is reversed: more initial public information reduces agents asymptotic knowledge by an amount in order of log(t) units of precision. When agents are sufficiently patient, this reduces welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Amador, Manuel & Weill, Pierre-Olivier, 2012. "Learning from private and public observations of othersʼ actions," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 147(3), pages 910-940.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:147:y:2012:i:3:p:910-940
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jet.2012.02.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Xavier Vives, 2017. "Endogenous Public Information and Welfare in Market Games," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(2), pages 935-963.
    2. Kenza Benhima, 2013. "Booms and Busts with dispersed information," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 13.11, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
    3. Mäkinen, Taneli & Ohl, Björn, 2015. "Information acquisition and learning from prices over the business cycle," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 158(PB), pages 585-633.
    4. Romain Baeriswyl & Camille Cornand & Bruno Ziliotto, 2016. "Observing and shaping the market: the dilemma of central banks," Working Papers 1623, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.
    5. Tarek A. Hassan & Thomas M. Mertens, 2017. "The Social Cost of Near-Rational Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(4), pages 1059-1103, April.
    6. repec:kap:jeczfn:v:122:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s00712-017-0530-z is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Raphael Boleslavsky & Bruce Carlin & Christopher Cotton, 2017. "Competing for Capital: Auditing and Credibility in Financial Reporting," Working Papers 1377, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    8. Kurlat, Pablo & Veldkamp, Laura, 2015. "Should we regulate financial information?," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 158(PB), pages 697-720.
    9. Avanidhar Subrahmanyam & Sheridan Titman, 2013. "Financial Market Shocks and the Macroeconomy," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 26(11), pages 2687-2717.
    10. Tarek A. Hassan & Thomas M. Mertens, 2015. "Information Aggregation in a Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Model," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 159-207.
    11. Arasteh, Abdollah, 2017. "Considering the investment decisions with real options games approach," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 1282-1294.
    12. Kei Kawakami, 2014. "Excessive Dynamic Trading: Propagation of Belief Shocks in Small Markets," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1188, The University of Melbourne.
    13. Stephen Morris & Hyun Song Shin, 2018. "Central bank forward guidance and the signal value of market prices," BIS Working Papers 692, Bank for International Settlements.
    14. Isabella Blengini & Kenza Benhima, 2016. "Optimal Monetary Policy when Information is Market-Generated," 2016 Meeting Papers 1223, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    15. Carlo Galli & Marco Bassetto, 2016. "Is Inflation Default? The Role of Information in Debt Crises," 2016 Meeting Papers 308, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    16. Rondina, Giacomo & Shim, Myungkyu, 2015. "Financial prices and information acquisition in large Cournot markets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 158(PB), pages 769-786.
    17. Tarek A. Hassan & Thomas M. Mertens, 2014. "Information Aggregation in a DSGE Model," NBER Working Papers 20193, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Daron Acemoglu & Ali Makhdoumi & Azarakhsh Malekian & Asuman Ozdaglar, 2017. "Fast and Slow Learning From Reviews," NBER Working Papers 24046, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Pavan, Alessandro & Vives, Xavier, 2015. "Information, Coordination, and Market Frictions: An Introduction," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 158(PB), pages 407-426.
    20. Thomas Lustenberger & Enzo Rossi, 2017. "The Social Value of Information: A Test of a Beauty and Non-Beauty Contest," Working Papers 2017-17, Swiss National Bank.
    21. repec:eee:macchp:v2-1065 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Myatt, David P. & Wallace, Chris, 2015. "Cournot competition and the social value of information," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 158(PB), pages 466-506.
    23. Makarov, Igor & Rytchkov, Oleg, 2012. "Forecasting the forecasts of others: Implications for asset pricing," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 147(3), pages 941-966.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Information aggregation; Learning; Value of information;

    JEL classification:

    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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