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Generalizing the core design principles for the efficacy of groups

Author

Listed:
  • Wilson, David Sloan
  • Ostrom, Elinor
  • Cox, Michael E.

Abstract

This article generalizes a set of core design principles for the efficacy of groups that was originally derived for groups attempting to manage common-pool resources (CPRs) such as irrigation systems, forests, and fisheries. The dominant way of thinking until recently was that commons situations invariably result in the tragedy of overuse, requiring either privatization (when possible) or top-down regulation. Based on a worldwide database of CPR groups, Ostrom proposed a set of principles that broadly captured the essential aspects of the institutional arrangements that succeeded, as contrasted to groups whose efforts failed. These principles can be generalized in two respects: first, by showing how they follow from foundational evolutionary principles; and second, by showing how they apply to a wider range of groups. The generality of the core design principles enables them to be used as a practical guide for improving the efficacy of many kinds of groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Wilson, David Sloan & Ostrom, Elinor & Cox, Michael E., 2013. "Generalizing the core design principles for the efficacy of groups," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 90(S), pages 21-32.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:90:y:2013:i:s:p:s21-s32
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2012.12.010
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Elinor Ostrom, 2010. "Beyond Markets and States: Polycentric Governance of Complex Economic Systems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 641-672, June.
    2. repec:cup:apsrev:v:55:y:1961:i:04:p:831-842_12 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Wilson, David Sloan & Gowdy, John M., 2013. "Evolution as a general theoretical framework for economics and public policy," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 90(S), pages 3-10.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Constantine Iliopoulos & Irini Theodorakopoulou, 2014. "Mandatory Cooperative and the Free Rider Problem: the Case of Santo Wines in Santorini, Greece," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 85(4), pages 663-681, December.
    2. Schlauch, Michael, 2014. "The Integrative Analysis of Economic Ecosystems: Reviewing labour market policies with new insights from permaculture and systems theory," MPRA Paper 53757, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:gam:jscscx:v:7:y:2018:i:3:p:49-:d:137205 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Farley, Joshua & Costanza, Robert & Flomenhoft, Gary & Kirk, Daniel, 2015. "The Vermont Common Assets Trust: An institution for sustainable, just and efficient resource allocation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 71-79.
    5. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:5:p:1586-:d:146553 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Elisabeth Schauppenlehner-Kloyber & Marianne Penker, 2016. "Between Participation and Collective Action—From Occasional Liaisons towards Long-Term Co-Management for Urban Resilience," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(7), pages 1-18, July.
    7. Eli Dourado & Alex Tabarrok, 2015. "Public choice perspectives on intellectual property," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 163(1), pages 129-151, April.
    8. John Gowdy & Lisi Krall, 2014. "Agriculture as a major evolutionary transition to human ultrasociality," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 179-202, July.
    9. Sarker, Ashutosh & Ikeda, Toru & Abe, Takaki & Inoue, Ken, 2015. "Design principles for managing coastal fisheries commons in present-day Japan," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 32-38.
    10. repec:eee:ecoser:v:10:y:2014:i:c:p:155-163 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:spr:jorgde:v:6:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s41469-017-0019-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Waring, Timothy M. & Goff, Sandra H. & Smaldino, Paul E., 2017. "The coevolution of economic institutions and sustainable consumption via cultural group selection," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 524-532.
    13. Russell Weaver, 2016. "Evolutionary Theory and Neighborhood Quality: A Multilevel Selection-inspired Approach to Studying Urban Property Conditions," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 11(2), pages 369-386, June.
    14. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:679-:d:134364 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Gowdy, John & Krall, Lisi, 2013. "The ultrasocial origin of the Anthropocene," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 137-147.
    16. David Harper, 2014. "Property rights as a complex adaptive system: how entrepreneurship transforms intellectual property structures," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 335-355, April.
    17. repec:spr:soinre:v:137:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11205-017-1615-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Stoelhorst, J.W. & Richerson, Peter J., 2013. "A naturalistic theory of economic organization," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 90(S), pages 45-56.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Elinor Ostrom; Common pool resource groups; Core design principles; Multilevel selection; Biocultural evolution;

    JEL classification:

    • A - General Economics and Teaching
    • D - Microeconomics
    • H - Public Economics
    • L - Industrial Organization
    • M - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics
    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics

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