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Project failure from corporate entrepreneurship: Managing the grief process

Author

Listed:
  • Shepherd, Dean A.
  • Covin, Jeffrey G.
  • Kuratko, Donald F.

Abstract

In this paper, we complement social cognitive theory with psychological theories on grief in our discussion of two approaches to grief management - grief regulation and grief normalization - that hold promise for enabling corporate entrepreneurs to cope with negative emotions induced by project failure. We propose that to the extent that organizational members have high self-efficacy for recovering from grief over project failure, or this coping self-efficacy can be built through the social support offered by the organizational environment, regulating rather than eliminating, grief via normalization processes will explain superior learning and motivational outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Shepherd, Dean A. & Covin, Jeffrey G. & Kuratko, Donald F., 2009. "Project failure from corporate entrepreneurship: Managing the grief process," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 588-600, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbvent:v:24:y:2009:i:6:p:588-600
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McGrath, Rita Gunther, 1995. "Advantage from adversity: Learning from disappointment in internal corporate ventures," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 121-142, March.
    2. Bandura, Albert, 1991. "Social cognitive theory of self-regulation," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 248-287, December.
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    5. Zahra, Shaker A., 1993. "Environment, corporate entrepreneurship, and financial performance: A taxonomic approach," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 319-340, July.
    6. Forbes, Daniel P., 2005. "Are some entrepreneurs more overconfident than others?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 623-640, September.
    7. Rita Gunther McGrath & Ming-Hone Tsai & S. Venkataraman & I. C. MacMillan, 1996. "Innovation, Competitive Advantage and Rent: A Model and Test," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 42(3), pages 389-403, March.
    8. Miller, Danny, 1992. "The icarus paradox: How exceptional companies bring about their own downfall," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 24-35.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dean A. Shepherd & Holger Patzelt & Trenton A. Williams & Dennis Warnecke, 2014. "How Does Project Termination Impact Project Team Members? Rapid Termination, ‘Creeping Death’, and Learning from Failure," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(4), pages 513-546, June.
    2. Patzelt, Holger & Shepherd, Dean A., 2011. "Negative emotions of an entrepreneurial career: Self-employment and regulatory coping behaviors," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 226-238, March.
    3. Malgorzata Rozkwitalska, 2016. "Thriving in Intercultural Interactions as an Antecedent of Organizational Creativity and Innovation (Prosperowanie w interakcjach miedzykulturowych jako poprzednik organizacyjnej kreatywnosci i innowa," Problemy Zarzadzania, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Management, vol. 14(61), pages 142-155.
    4. Baron, Robert A. & Hmieleski, Keith M. & Henry, Rebecca A., 2012. "Entrepreneurs' dispositional positive affect: The potential benefits – and potential costs – of being “up”," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 310-324.
    5. Dean A. Shepherd & Melissa S. Cardon, 2009. "Negative Emotional Reactions to Project Failure and the Self-Compassion to Learn from the Experience," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(6), pages 923-949, September.
    6. Cope, Jason, 2011. "Entrepreneurial learning from failure: An interpretative phenomenological analysis," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 604-623.
    7. Kammerlander, Nadine & Burger, Dominik & Fust, Alexander & Fueglistaller, Urs, 2015. "Exploration and exploitation in established small and medium-sized enterprises: The effect of CEOs' regulatory focus," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 582-602.
    8. Wincent, Joakim & Thorgren, Sara & Anokhin, Sergey, 2014. "Entrepreneurial orientation and network board diversity in network organizations," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 327-344.
    9. Patrick Kreiser & Louis Marino & Donald Kuratko & K. Weaver, 2013. "Disaggregating entrepreneurial orientation: the non-linear impact of innovativeness, proactiveness and risk-taking on SME performance," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 273-291, February.
    10. Pablo D’Este & Alberto Marzucchi & Francesco Rentocchini, 2014. "Exploring and yet failing less: Learning from exploration, exploitation and human capital in R&D," SPRU Working Paper Series 2014-23, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex.
    11. Parker, Simon C., 2013. "Do serial entrepreneurs run successively better-performing businesses?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 652-666.

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