IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jbrese/v71y2017icp74-83.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The origins of policy ideas: The importance of think tanks in the enterprise policy process in the UK

Author

Listed:
  • Arshed, Norin

Abstract

There is no doubt that enterprise policy has become a popular choice for governments seeking to enhance economic growth, despite criticisms of its ineffectiveness. The purpose of this study is to understand the ways in which think tanks and their ideas shape the enterprise policy-making process: how enterprise policy ideas originate, who is involved, what sort of relationships exist between the stakeholders and how these relationships affect the overall process of enterprise policy-making. The application of institutional theory provides a detailed theoretical understanding of the process, the environment and the actors. Interviews with representatives from eight think tanks revealed that the ideas presented by think tanks to government have no formal process and are dominated by the relationships and informal channels of communication between key actors, allowing for an alternative focus on the origins of policy ideas as a possible explanation for the ineffectiveness of enterprise policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Arshed, Norin, 2017. "The origins of policy ideas: The importance of think tanks in the enterprise policy process in the UK," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 74-83.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:71:y:2017:i:c:p:74-83
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2016.10.015
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0148296316306087
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert Huggins & Nicholas Williams, 2009. "Enterprise and Public Policy: A Review of Labour Government Intervention in the United Kingdom," Environment and Planning C, , vol. 27(1), pages 19-41, February.
    2. Philippe Van Cauwenberge & Heidi Vander Bauwhede & Bilitis Schoonjans, 2013. "An evaluation of public spending: the effectiveness of a government-supported networking program in Flanders," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 31(1), pages 24-38, February.
    3. David Pickernell & Christine Atkinson & Christopher Miller, 2015. "Government SME intervention policy: perception is 9/10ths of the truth?," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 33(1), pages 4-8, February.
    4. Francis J. Greene & Kevin F. Mole & David J. Storey, 2004. "Does More Mean Worse? Three Decades of Enterprise Policy in the Tees Valley," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 41(7), pages 1207-1228, June.
    5. Norin Arshed & Sara Carter & Colin Mason, 2014. "The ineffectiveness of entrepreneurship policy: is policy formulation to blame?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 639-659, October.
    6. Philippe Van Cauwenberge & Heidi Vander Bauwhede & Bilitis Schoonjans, 2013. "An Evaluation of Public Spending: The Effectiveness of a Government-Supported Networking Program in Flanders," Environment and Planning C, , vol. 31(1), pages 24-38, February.
    7. Craft, Jonathan & Howlett, Michael, 2012. "Policy formulation, governance shifts and policy influence: location and content in policy advisory systems," Journal of Public Policy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(02), pages 79-98, August.
    8. Robert Huggins & Nicholas Williams, 2009. "Enterprise and public policy: a review of Labour government intervention in the United Kingdom," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 27(1), pages 19-41, February.
    9. Markku Sotarauta & Riina Pulkkinen, 2011. "Institutional Entrepreneurship for Knowledge Regions: In Search of a Fresh Set of Questions for Regional Innovation Studies," Environment and Planning C, , vol. 29(1), pages 96-112, February.
    10. T. Lawrence & R. Suddaby & B. Leca, 2011. "Institutional work - Re-focusing institutional studies of organization," Post-Print hal-00802293, HAL.
    11. Castaño, María-Soledad & Méndez, María-Teresa & Galindo, Miguel-Ángel, 2015. "The effect of social, cultural, and economic factors on entrepreneurship," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 68(7), pages 1496-1500.
    12. Lenihan, Helena, 2011. "Enterprise policy evaluation: Is there a 'new' way of doing it?," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 323-332, November.
    13. Robert Blackburn & Monder Ram, 2006. "Fix or fixation? The contributions and limitations of entrepreneurship and small firms to combating social exclusion," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 73-89, January.
    14. Julie Battilana & Bernard Leca & Eva Boxenbaum, 2009. "How actors change institutions : Towards a theory of institutional entrepreneurship," Post-Print hal-00576509, HAL.
    15. J. Battilana & B. Leca & E. Boxenbaum, 2009. "Agency and Institutions: A Review on Institutional Entrepreneurship," Post-Print hal-00802301, HAL.
    16. Norin Arshed & Colin Mason & Sara Carter, 2016. "Exploring the disconnect in policy implementation: A case of enterprise policy in England," Environment and Planning C, , vol. 34(8), pages 1582-1611, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:71:y:2017:i:c:p:74-83. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jbusres .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.