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Low socioeconomic class and consumer complexity expectations for new product technology

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  • Trujillo, Carlos A.
  • Barrios, Andrés
  • Camacho, Sonia M.
  • Rosa, José Antonio

Abstract

This research improves the field's understanding of subsistence consumers by investigating how low socioeconomic class relates to expectations of complexity from new products. The study tests a model of the relationship between consumer socioeconomic class, self-esteem, self-assessed capabilities, and knowledge about product domains, and the influence of self-esteem, self-assessed capabilities, and product domain knowledge on consumer expectations of complexity when facing a new product technology. A sample of 266 Colombian consumers representing different socio-economic classes is used to test the model using structural equation modeling. The results show that self-esteem, self-assessed capabilities, and product domain knowledge are predictive of expectations of complexity, with low self-esteem, low capabilities, and low product knowledge leading to higher complexity expectations. Socioeconomic status relates closely to self-esteem, self-assessed capabilities, and product domain knowledge and can be used as a surrogate for the individual-level constructs.

Suggested Citation

  • Trujillo, Carlos A. & Barrios, Andrés & Camacho, Sonia M. & Rosa, José Antonio, 2010. "Low socioeconomic class and consumer complexity expectations for new product technology," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 63(6), pages 538-547, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:63:y:2010:i:6:p:538-547
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:ijrema:v:30:y:2013:i:1:p:83-97 is not listed on IDEAS

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