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Innovation generation in upstream and downstream business relationships

Author

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  • Roy, Subroto
  • Sivakumar, K.

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to examine the phenomenon of innovation generation in a firm's upstream and downstream business relationships. The study considers the role of knowledge redundancy and relational embeddedness on the generation of radical and incremental innovations. The study further considers the moderating role of complexity and globalization on the link between the independent variables and innovation generation. By deriving several theoretically sound and managerially useful propositions, this research advances knowledge in the business-to-business and innovation generation domains and offers insights for managerial practice.

Suggested Citation

  • Roy, Subroto & Sivakumar, K., 2010. "Innovation generation in upstream and downstream business relationships," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 63(12), pages 1356-1363, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:63:y:2010:i:12:p:1356-1363
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ren, Shengce & Eisingerich, Andreas B. & Tsai, Huei-ting, 2015. "Search scope and innovation performance of emerging-market firms," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 102-108.
    2. repec:eee:jbrese:v:80:y:2017:i:c:p:127-140 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ren, Shengce & Tsai, Huei-Ting & Eisingerich, Andreas B., 2016. "Case-based asymmetric modeling of firms with high versus low outcomes in implementing changes in direction," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 500-507.
    4. Stanko, Michael A. & Olleros, Xavier, 2013. "Industry growth and the knowledge spillover regime: Does outsourcing harm innovativeness but help profit?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(10), pages 2007-2016.

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