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International monetary transmission in East Asia: Floaters, non-floaters, and capital controls

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  • Kim, Soyoung
  • Yang, Doo Yong

Abstract

This paper analyzes the impacts of the United States (US) monetary shocks on East Asian countries using structural vector-autoregression (VAR) model. We find that the impacts of the US monetary shocks on East Asian domestic interest rates and exchange rates contradict conventional wisdom. The conventional exchange rate channel is unlikely to play much role in the transmission of the US monetary policy shocks to floaters in East Asian countries, excluding Japan. In these countries, the domestic interest rates respond strongly to the US interest rate changes, by giving up monetary autonomy, probably because of fear of floating. However, the domestic interest rate does not respond much in countries with fixed exchange rate regimes and capital account restrictions, such as China and Malaysia. This may suggest that the countries with fixed exchange rate regimes enjoy a higher degree of monetary autonomy, most likely with the help of capital account restrictions.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim, Soyoung & Yang, Doo Yong, 2012. "International monetary transmission in East Asia: Floaters, non-floaters, and capital controls," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 305-316.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:japwor:v:24:y:2012:i:4:p:305-316
    DOI: 10.1016/j.japwor.2012.05.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 1995. "Some Empirical Evidence on the Effects of Shocks to Monetary Policy on Exchange Rates," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 975-1009.
    2. di Giovanni, Julian & Shambaugh, Jay C., 2008. "The impact of foreign interest rates on the economy: The role of the exchange rate regime," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 341-361, March.
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    5. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles L., 1999. "Monetary policy shocks: What have we learned and to what end?," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 65-148 Elsevier.
    6. Frankel, Jeffrey & Schmukler, Sergio L. & Serven, Luis, 2004. "Global transmission of interest rates: monetary independence and currency regime," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 701-733, September.
    7. Ogawa, Eiji & Yang, Doo Yong, 2008. "The dilemma of exchange rate arrangements in East Asia," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 217-235, March.
    8. Kim, Soyoung, 2001. "International transmission of U.S. monetary policy shocks: Evidence from VAR's," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 339-372, October.
    9. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Macroeconomics and Reality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 1-48, January.
    10. Menzie D. Chinn & Hiro Ito, 2002. "Capital Account Liberalization, Institutions and Financial Development: Cross Country Evidence," NBER Working Papers 8967, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Jacques Miniane & John H. Rogers, 2007. "Capital Controls and the International Transmission of U.S. Money Shocks," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(5), pages 1003-1035, August.
    12. Ashok Bhundia & Mark R. Stone, 2004. "A New Taxonomy of Monetary Regimes," IMF Working Papers 04/191, International Monetary Fund.
    13. repec:hrv:faseco:34721963 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Vespignani, Joaquin L. & Ratti, Ronald A., 2016. "Not all international monetary shocks are alike for the Japanese economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 822-837.
    2. Liu, Zheng & Spiegel, Mark M. & Tai, Andrew, 2017. "Measuring the effects of dollar appreciation on Asia: A FAVAR approach," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 353-370.
    3. Vu, Tuan Khai & Nakata, Hayato, 2014. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Oil Price Fluctuations in ASEAN Countries: Analysis Using a VAR with Block Exogeneity," Discussion Paper Series 619, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    4. Mala Raghavan & Mardi Dungey, 2015. "Should ASEAN-5 monetary policy-makers act pre-emptively against stock market bubbles?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(11), pages 1086-1105, March.
    5. Yiping Huang & Peichu Xie & Jiao Wang, 2014. "International Transmission of the People's Bank of China's Balance Sheet Expansion," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 9(2), pages 276-296, July.
    6. repec:eee:finsta:v:29:y:2017:i:c:p:106-116 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Soyoung Kim & Aaron Mehrotra, 2015. "Managing price and financial stability objectives - what can we learn from the Asia-Pacific region?," BIS Working Papers 533, Bank for International Settlements.
    8. Anastasios Evgenidis & Costas Siriopoulos, 2015. "What are the International Channels Through Which a US Policy Shock is Transmitted to The World Economies? Evidence from a Time Varying FAVAR," Working Papers 190, Bank of Greece.
    9. repec:eee:asieco:v:54:y:2018:i:c:p:1-21 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Structural VAR; Monetary shocks; Interest rate; Exchange rate; Exchange rate regime;

    JEL classification:

    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange

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