IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Salary and job satisfaction among economics and business graduates: The effect of match between degree field and job


  • Robst, John
  • VanGilder, Jennifer


The purpose of this paper was to compare employment outcomes for individuals who majored in economics and business administration. Economics majors were more likely to work in a job unrelated to the degree field than business administration majors. Economics majors earned higher wages, and mismatch had a smaller effect on wages for economics majors than business majors. Mismatch also had a smaller effect on aspects of job satisfaction for economics graduates compared to business graduates.

Suggested Citation

  • Robst, John & VanGilder, Jennifer, 2016. "Salary and job satisfaction among economics and business graduates: The effect of match between degree field and job," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 30-40.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ireced:v:21:y:2016:i:c:p:30-40 DOI: 10.1016/j.iree.2015.11.001

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dan A. Black & Seth Sanders & Lowell Taylor, 2003. "The Economic Reward for Studying Economics," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 41(3), pages 365-377, July.
    2. Mary O. Borg & Harriet A. Stranahan, 2010. "Evidence On The Relationship Between Economics And Critical Thinking Skills," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 28(1), pages 80-93, January.
    3. Rachel A. Willis & Paul J. Pieper, 1996. "The Economics Major: A Cross-Sectional View," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(4), pages 337-349, October.
    4. W. Lee Hansen, 2001. "Expected Proficiencies for Undergraduate Economics Majors," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 231-242, January.
    5. David A. Freedman & Richard A. Berk, 2008. "Weighting Regressions by Propensity Scores," Evaluation Review, , vol. 32(4), pages 392-409, August.
    6. Hansen, W Lee, 1986. "What Knowledge Is Most Worth Knowing-For Economics Majors?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 149-152, May.
    7. Francis Green & Yu Zhu, 2010. "Overqualification, job dissatisfaction, and increasing dispersion in the returns to graduate education," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 62(4), pages 740-763, October.
    8. Robst, John, 2007. "Education and job match: The relatedness of college major and work," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 397-407, August.
    9. Michael K. Salemi & Carlie Eubanks, 1996. "Accounting for the Rise and Fall in the Number of Economics Majors with the Discouraged-Business-Major Hypothesis," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(4), pages 350-361, October.
    10. John Robst, 2007. "Education, College Major, and Job Match: Gender Differences in Reasons for Mismatch," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 159-175.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ireced:v:21:y:2016:i:c:p:30-40. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.