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When trade hurts: Consumption indivisibilities and labor market distortions

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  • Krishna, Kala
  • Yavas, Cemile

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  • Krishna, Kala & Yavas, Cemile, 2005. "When trade hurts: Consumption indivisibilities and labor market distortions," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 413-427, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:inecon:v:67:y:2005:i:2:p:413-427
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ng Yew Kwang, 1965. "Why do People Buy Lottery Tickets? Choices Involving Risk and the Indivisibility of Expenditure," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 73, pages 530-530.
    2. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert Vishny, 1989. "Income Distribution, Market Size, and Industrialization," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 104(3), pages 537-564.
    3. Kiminori Matsuyama, 1995. "Complementarities and Cumulative Processes in Models of Monopolistic Competition," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(2), pages 701-729, June.
    4. Gérard Roland & Thierry Verdier, 1999. "Transition and the output fall," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(1), pages 1-28, March.
    5. Davis, Donald R, 1998. "Does European Unemployment Prop Up American Wages? National Labor Markets and Global Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 478-494, June.
    6. Kala Krishna & Cemile Yavas, 2002. "When Does Trade Hurt? Market, Transition and Developing Economies," NBER Working Papers 8995, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Richard A. Brecher, 1974. "Minimum Wage Rates and the Pure Theory of International Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 88(1), pages 98-116.
    8. Gary H. Jefferson, 1999. "Missing Market in Labor Quality: The Role of Quality Markets in Transition," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 260, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    9. Magee, Stephen P, 1973. "Factor Market Distortions, Production, and Trade: A Survey," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(1), pages 1-43, March.
    10. Brecher, Richard A., 1974. "Optimal commercial policy for a minimum-wage economy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 139-149, May.
    11. Weiss, Andrew W, 1980. "Job Queues and Layoffs in Labor Markets with Flexible Wages," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(3), pages 526-538, June.
    12. Kala Krishna & Abhiroop Mukhopadhyay & Cemile Yavas, 2002. "Trade with Labor Market Distortions and Heterogeneous Labor: Why Trade Can Hurt," NBER Working Papers 9086, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tarasov Alexander, 2009. "Income Distribution, Market Structure, and Individual Welfare," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-39, December.
    2. Herzer, Dierk, 2013. "Cross-Country Heterogeneity and the Trade-Income Relationship," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 194-211.
    3. Reto Foellmi & Christian Hepenstrick & Josef Zweimüller, 2010. "Non-homothetic preferences, parallel imports and the extensive margin of international trade," IEW - Working Papers 497, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    4. Soo, Kwok Tong, 2017. "Indivisibilities in the Ricardian model of trade," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 311-317.
    5. Dierk Herzer, 2017. "The Long-run Relationship Between Trade and Population Health: Evidence from Five Decades," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 462-487, February.
    6. Joachim Stibora & Albert de Vaal, 2015. "Does Preferential Trade Benefit Poor Countries? A General Equilibrium Assessment with Nonhomothetic Preferences," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(2), pages 239-270, May.
    7. Stibora, Joachim & de Vaal, Albert, 2007. "Trade Liberalization and its Fiscal Implications in a North-South Trade Model," Economics Discussion Papers 2007-1, School of Economics, Kingston University London.

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