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Technological strategies and learning-by-exporting: The case of Brazilian manufacturing firms, 2006–2008

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  • Araújo, Bruno César
  • Salerno, Mario Sergio

Abstract

This article assesses the relationship between learning by exporting and technological strategies for Brazilian manufacturing firms from 2006 to 2008. Technological strategies are characterised by the importance placed on innovation activities, sources of information and cooperation for innovation, and the location of these sources. Combining factor analysis with regression analysis, we find that (i) new exporters become more productive and larger than non-exporters; (ii) technological strategies improve the productivity and size of all firms; and (iii) the differentiated technological strategies of new exporters are generally not correlated with learning by exporting. Learning by exporting might be related to factors that are not captured by the Brazilian Technological Innovation Survey, and the absence of correlation between learning by exporting and technological strategies might reflect some missed opportunities for technological learning from international trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Araújo, Bruno César & Salerno, Mario Sergio, 2015. "Technological strategies and learning-by-exporting: The case of Brazilian manufacturing firms, 2006–2008," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 725-738.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:iburev:v:24:y:2015:i:5:p:725-738
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ibusrev.2015.01.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:iburev:v:26:y:2017:i:3:p:502-514 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Buckley, Peter J. & Munjal, Surender & Enderwick, Peter & Forsans, Nicolas, 2016. "The role of experiential and non-experiential knowledge in cross-border acquisitions: The case of Indian multinational enterprises," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 51(5), pages 675-685.
    3. Gleich, Wolfgang & Schmeisser, Bjoern & Zschoche, Miriam, 2017. "The influence of competition on international sourcing strategies in the service sector," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 279-287.

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