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ARCH and GARCH models vs. martingale volatility of finance market returns


  • McCauley, Joseph L.


ARCH and GARCH models assume either i.i.d. or 'white noise' as is usual in regression analysis, while also assuming memory in a conditional mean square fluctuation with stationary increments. We will show that ARCH/GARCH is inconsistent with uncorrelated increments, violating the i.i.d. and 'white' assumptions, and violating finance data and the efficient market hypothesis as well.

Suggested Citation

  • McCauley, Joseph L., 2009. "ARCH and GARCH models vs. martingale volatility of finance market returns," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 151-153, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:finana:v:18:y:2009:i:4:p:151-153

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Katarina Juselius & Ronald MacDonald, 2000. "International Parity Relationships between Germany and the United States: A Joint Modelling Approach," Discussion Papers 00-10, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    2. McCauley, Joseph L. & Bassler, Kevin E. & Gunaratne, Gemunu H., 2008. "Martingales, detrending data, and the efficient market hypothesis," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 387(1), pages 202-216.
    3. Bassler, Kevin E. & McCauley, Joseph L. & Gunaratne, Gemunu H., 2006. "Nonstationary increments, scaling distributions, and variable diffusion processes in financial markets," MPRA Paper 2126, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ausloos, Marcel & Jovanovic, Franck & Schinckus, Christophe, 2016. "On the “usual” misunderstandings between econophysics and finance: Some clarifications on modelling approaches and efficient market hypothesis," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 7-14.
    2. Jovanovic, Franck & Schinckus, Christophe, 2016. "Breaking down the barriers between econophysics and financial economics," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 256-266.
    3. Al-Khazali, Osamah M. & Leduc, Guillaume & Pyun, Chong Soo, 2011. "Market efficiency of floating exchange rate systems: Some evidence from Pacific-Asian countries," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 154-168.
    4. Jovanovic, Franck & Schinckus, Christophe, 2017. "Econophysics and Financial Economics: An Emerging Dialogue," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780190205034, June.


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