IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

An Engine of Growth: Real Bills and Schumpeterian Banking in Antebellum New York

  • Bodenhorn, Howard

No abstract is available for this item.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014-4983(99)90719-2
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Explorations in Economic History.

Volume (Year): 36 (1999)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 278-302

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:36:y:1999:i:3:p:278-302
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622830

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Israel M. Kirzner, 1997. "Entrepreneurial Discovery and the Competitive Market Process: An Austrian Approach," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(1), pages 60-85, March.
  2. H. G. Moulton, 1918. "Commercial Banking and Capital Formation: II," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26, pages 638.
  3. Lance Davis, 1966. "The Capital Markets and Industrial Concentration: The U.S. and U.K., a Comparative Study," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 19(2), pages 255-272, 08.
  4. Bodenhorn, Howard, 1992. "Capital Mobility and Financial Integration in Antebellum America," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(03), pages 585-610, September.
  5. Robert G. King & Ross Levine, 1993. "Finance and Growth: Schumpeter Might Be Right," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 717-737.
  6. Fama, Eugene F., 1985. "What's different about banks?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 29-39, January.
  7. Mitchell Berlin, 1996. "For better and for worse: three lending relationships," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Nov, pages 3-12.
  8. Howard Bodenhorn & Hugh Rockoff, 1992. "Regional Interest Rates in Antebellum America," NBER Chapters, in: Strategic Factors in Nineteenth Century American Economic History: A Volume to Honor Robert W. Fogel, pages 159-187 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Charles Calomiris, 1995. "The Costs of Rejecting Universal Banking: American Finance in the German Mirror, 1870-1914," NBER Chapters, in: Coordination and Information: Historical Perspectives on the Organization of Enterprise, pages 257-322 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Davis, Lance E., 1960. "The New England Textile Mills and the Capital Markets: A Study of Industrial Borrowing 1840–1860," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(01), pages 1-30, March.
  11. Sylla, Richard, 1971. "American banking and growth in the nineteenth century: A partial view of the terrain," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 197-227.
  12. Sokoloff, Kenneth L., 1984. "Investment in Fixed and Working Capital During Early Industrialization: Evidence from U. S. Manufacturing Firms," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(02), pages 545-556, June.
  13. Petersen, Mitchell A & Rajan, Raghuram G, 1994. " The Benefits of Lending Relationships: Evidence from Small Business Data," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(1), pages 3-37, March.
  14. H. G. Moulton, 1918. "Commercial Banking and Capital Formation: I," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26, pages 484.
  15. King, Robert G. & Levine, Ross, 1993. "Finance, entrepreneurship and growth: Theory and evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 513-542, December.
  16. Eugene White, 1998. "Were banks special intermediaries in late nineteenth century America?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 13-32.
  17. Davis, Lance E., 1965. "The Investment Market, 1870–1914: The Evolution of a National Market," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(03), pages 355-399, September.
  18. H. G. Moulton, 1918. "Commercial Banking and Capital Formation: III," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26, pages 705.
  19. James, John A., 1976. "The Development of the National Money Market, 1893-1911," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(04), pages 878-897, December.
  20. Douglas W. Diamond, 1984. "Financial Intermediation and Delegated Monitoring," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(3), pages 393-414.
  21. H. G. Moulton, 1918. "Commercial Banking and Capital Formation: IV," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26, pages 849.
  22. Adams, Donald R., 1978. "Portfolio Management and Profitability in Early-Nineteenth-Century Banking," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(01), pages 61-79, March.
  23. Mitchell A. Petersen & Raghuram G. Rajan, 1994. "The Effect of Credit Market Competition on Lending Relationships," NBER Working Papers 4921, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  24. Bodenhorn, Howard, 1997. "Private Banking in Antebellum Virginia: Thomas Branch & Sons of Petersburg," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 71(04), pages 513-542, December.
  25. Sylla, Richard, 1969. "Federal Policy, Banking Market Structure, and Capital Mobilization in the United States, 1863–1913," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(04), pages 657-686, December.
  26. Adams, Donald R., 1972. "The Bank of Stephen Girard, 1812–1831," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(04), pages 841-868, December.
  27. Rosenberg, Nathan, 1976. "On Technological Expectations," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 86(343), pages 523-35, September.
  28. Pollard, Sidney, 1964. "Fixed Capital in the Industrial Revolution in Britain," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(03), pages 299-314, September.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:36:y:1999:i:3:p:278-302. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shamier, Wendy)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.