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Methodology for evaluating existing infrastructure and facilitating the diffusion of PEVs

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  • Reid, Sergey
  • Spence, David B.

Abstract

Recent U.S. state and federal legislation have been implemented with the intent of promoting the diffusion of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). Meanwhile, the federal government has passed new regulation aimed at increasing fuel efficiency standards of gasoline powered vehicles in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, we examine the existing barriers that impact PEV diffusion. We argue that increased fuel efficiency standards coupled with declining gasoline prices conflicts with the implemented PEV incentives. Using a geospatial method, we demonstrate how policymakers can create regionally weighted markets based on consumer surveys to facilitate the development of a national policy for nascent products like the PEVs.

Suggested Citation

  • Reid, Sergey & Spence, David B., 2016. "Methodology for evaluating existing infrastructure and facilitating the diffusion of PEVs," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 1-10.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:89:y:2016:i:c:p:1-10
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2015.11.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jiali Yu & Peng Yang & Kai Zhang & Faping Wang & Lixin Miao, 2018. "Evaluating the Effect of Policies and the Development of Charging Infrastructure on Electric Vehicle Diffusion in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(10), pages 1-25, September.
    2. Y. Li & C.J.M. Kool & P.J. Engelen, 2016. "Hydrogen-Fuel Infrastructure Investment with Endogenous Demand : A Real Options Approach," Working Papers 16-12, Utrecht School of Economics.

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