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Exploring driving factors of energy-related CO2 emissions in Chinese provinces: A case of Liaoning

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  • Geng, Yong
  • Zhao, Hongyan
  • Liu, Zhu
  • Xue, Bing
  • Fujita, Tsuyoshi
  • Xi, Fengming

Abstract

In order to uncover driving forces for provincial CO2 emission in China, a case study was undertaken to shed light on the CO2 emission growth in such a region. Liaoning province was selected due to its typical features as one industrial province. The environmental input–output analysis and structure decomposing analysis have been conducted in order to provide a holistic picture on Liaoning's CO2 emissions during 1997–2007. Research outcomes indicate that rapid increase of per capita consumption activities is the main driver for Liaoning to have a significant CO2 emission growth, followed by consumption structure, production structure and population size. Energy intensity and energy structure partly offset the CO2 emission increase. Electricity power and heat supply and construction sectors caused the most CO2 emission, indicating that more specific mitigation policies for these two sectors should be prepared. From final demand point of view, it is clear that trade plays a leading role in regional CO2 emission, followed by fixed capital investment and urban household consumption which become increasingly important over time. Consequently, in order to realize low carbon development, local governments should consider all these factors so that appropriate mitigation policies can be raised by considering the local realities.

Suggested Citation

  • Geng, Yong & Zhao, Hongyan & Liu, Zhu & Xue, Bing & Fujita, Tsuyoshi & Xi, Fengming, 2013. "Exploring driving factors of energy-related CO2 emissions in Chinese provinces: A case of Liaoning," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 820-826.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:60:y:2013:i:c:p:820-826
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2013.05.054
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    References listed on IDEAS

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