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Public attitudes to climate change and carbon mitigation—Implications for energy-associated behaviours

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  • von Borgstede, Chris
  • Andersson, Maria
  • Johnsson, Filip

Abstract

This work explores public opinions regarding climate change and mitigation options and examines how psychological factors, such as attitudes, norms, and willingness to pay, determine self-reported energy-efficient behaviour. The aim is to create knowledge for the design and implementation of policy measures. The results of an opinion poll conducted in 2005 and 2010 are compared. The number of respondents favouring new technologies as a way to reduce emissions was substantially lower in 2010 than in 2005, whereas there was an increase in the number of people who acknowledged that lifestyle changes are necessary to counteract climate changes. This indicates an increased awareness among the public of the need for lifestyle changes, which could facilitate implementation of policies promoting environmental behaviour. Renewable energy and energy saving measures were ranked as the top two measures for mitigating climate change in both polls. In determining which energy behaviours of the public are determined by psychological factors, an analysis of the 2010 survey revealed that respondents with pro-environmental attitudes towards global warming favour significantly increased use of renewable energy technologies and greater engagement in energy-efficient behaviours.

Suggested Citation

  • von Borgstede, Chris & Andersson, Maria & Johnsson, Filip, 2013. "Public attitudes to climate change and carbon mitigation—Implications for energy-associated behaviours," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 182-193.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:57:y:2013:i:c:p:182-193 DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2013.01.051
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Rahman, Abul & Khanam, Tahamina & Pelkonen, Paavo, 2017. "People’s knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards stump harvesting for bioenergy production in Finland," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 107-116.
    2. van Sluisveld, Mariësse A.E. & Martínez, Sara Herreras & Daioglou, Vassilis & van Vuuren, Detlef P., 2016. "Exploring the implications of lifestyle change in 2°C mitigation scenarios using the IMAGE integrated assessment model," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 309-319.
    3. Hanimann, Raphael & Vinterbäck, Johan & Mark-Herbert, Cecilia, 2015. "Consumer behavior in renewable electricity: Can branding in accordance with identity signaling increase demand for renewable electricity and strengthen supplier brands?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 11-21.
    4. AlSabbagh, Maha & Siu, Yim Ling & Guehnemann, Astrid & Barrett, John, 2017. "Integrated approach to the assessment of CO2e-mitigation measures for the road passenger transport sector in Bahrain," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 203-215.
    5. Ó Broin, Eoin & Nässén, Jonas & Johnsson, Filip, 2015. "Energy efficiency policies for space heating in EU countries: A panel data analysis for the period 1990–2010," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 211-223.
    6. Perlaviciute, Goda & Steg, Linda, 2014. "Contextual and psychological factors shaping evaluations and acceptability of energy alternatives: Integrated review and research agenda," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 361-381.
    7. repec:eee:jbrese:v:82:y:2018:i:c:p:56-67 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Salla Annala & Satu Viljainen & Merja Pakkanen & Kristiina Hukki, 2016. "Consumer preferences in engaging in a sustainable lifestyle," International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 10(1), pages 1-18.
    9. Tsantopoulos, Georgios & Arabatzis, Garyfallos & Tampakis, Stilianos, 2014. "Public attitudes towards photovoltaic developments: Case study from Greece," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 94-106.
    10. Noblet, Caroline L. & Teisl, Mario F. & Evans, Keith & Anderson, Mark W. & McCoy, Shannon & Cervone, Edmund, 2015. "Public preferences for investments in renewable energy production and energy efficiency," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 177-186.
    11. Akhmat, Ghulam & Zaman, Khalid & Shukui, Tan & Sajjad, Faiza, 2014. "Does energy consumption contribute to climate change? Evidence from major regions of the world," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 123-134.
    12. repec:eee:rensus:v:80:y:2017:i:c:p:562-571 is not listed on IDEAS

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