IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/enepol/v39y2011i9p5269-5279.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Designing building energy efficiency programs for greenhouse gas reductions

Author

Listed:
  • Blackhurst, Michael
  • Lima Azevedo, Inês
  • Scott Matthews, H.
  • Hendrickson, Chris T.

Abstract

Costs and benefits of building energy efficiency are estimated as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Pittsburgh, PA and Austin, TX. The analysis includes electricity and natural gas consumption, covering 75% of building energy consumption in Pittsburgh and 85% in Austin. Two policy objectives were evaluated: maximize GHG reductions given initial budget constraints or maximize social savings given target GHG reductions. This approach evaluates the trade-offs between three primary and often conflicting program design parameters: initial capital constraints, social savings, and GHG reductions. Results suggest uncertainty in local stocks, demands, and efficiency significantly impacts anticipated outcomes. Annual GHG reductions of 1 ton CO2 eq/capita/yr in Pittsburgh could cost near nothing or over $20 per capita annually. Capital-constrained policies generate slightly less social savings (a present value of a few hundred dollars per capita) than policies that maximize social savings. However, sectors and end uses targeted for intervention vary depending on policy objectives and constraints. Optimal efficiency investment strategies for some end uses vary significantly (in excess of 100%) between Pittsburgh and Austin, suggesting that resources and guidance conducted at the national scale may mislead state and local decision-makers. Results are used to provide recommendations for efficiency program administrators.

Suggested Citation

  • Blackhurst, Michael & Lima Azevedo, Inês & Scott Matthews, H. & Hendrickson, Chris T., 2011. "Designing building energy efficiency programs for greenhouse gas reductions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 5269-5279, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:9:p:5269-5279
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030142151100423X
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daniel Fylstra & Leon Lasdon & John Watson & Allan Waren, 1998. "Design and Use of the Microsoft Excel Solver," Interfaces, INFORMS, vol. 28(5), pages 29-55, October.
    2. Sorrell, Steve & Dimitropoulos, John & Sommerville, Matt, 2009. "Empirical estimates of the direct rebound effect: A review," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1356-1371, April.
    3. A. Greening, Lorna & Greene, David L. & Difiglio, Carmen, 2000. "Energy efficiency and consumption -- the rebound effect -- a survey," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(6-7), pages 389-401, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ghosh, Neal K. & Blackhurst, Michael F., 2014. "Energy savings and the rebound effect with multiple energy services and efficiency correlation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 55-66.
    2. Mahlia, T.M.I. & Tohno, S. & Tezuka, T., 2013. "International experience on incentive program in support of fuel economy standards and labelling for motor vehicle: A comprehensive review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 18-33.
    3. Bouhou, Nour-El Imane & Blackhurst, Michael F. & Torres, Pamela, 2015. "An empirical analysis of joint residential electricity efficiency gains within and across end uses: implications for demand-side management," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 61-70.
    4. Marchand, Robert D. & Koh, S.C. Lenny & Morris, Jonathan C., 2015. "Delivering energy efficiency and carbon reduction schemes in England: Lessons from Green Deal Pioneer Places," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 96-106.
    5. repec:eee:enepol:v:108:y:2017:i:c:p:538-550 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Streimikiene, Dalia & Baležentis, Tomas & Kriščiukaitienė, Irena, 2012. "Promoting interactions between local climate change mitigation, sustainable energy development, and rural development policies in Lithuania," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 699-710.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:9:p:5269-5279. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.