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A co-integration analysis of the price and income elasticities of energy demand in Turkish agriculture

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  • Türkekul, Berna
  • UnakItan, Gökhan

Abstract

Agriculture has an important role in every country's development. Particularly, the contribution of agriculture to development and competitiveness is increasing with agricultural productivity growth. Productivity, in turn, is closely associated with direct and indirect use of energy as an input. Therefore, the importance of energy in agriculture cannot be denied as one of the basic inputs to the economic growth process. Following the importance of energy in Turkish agriculture, this study aims to estimate the long- and short-run relationship of energy consumption, agricultural GDP, and energy prices via co-integration and error correction (ECM) analysis. Annual data from 1970 to 2008 for diesel and electricity consumptions are utilized to estimate long-run and short-run elasticities. According to ECM analysis, for the diesel demand model, the long-run income and price elasticities were calculated as 1.47 and -0.38, respectively. For the electricity demand model, income and price elasticities were calculated at 0.19 and -0.72, respectively, in the long run. Briefly, in Turkey, support for energy use in agriculture should be continued in order to ensure sustainability in agriculture, increase competitiveness in international markets, and balance farmers' income.

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  • Türkekul, Berna & UnakItan, Gökhan, 2011. "A co-integration analysis of the price and income elasticities of energy demand in Turkish agriculture," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2416-2423, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:5:p:2416-2423
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ben Jebli, Mehdi & Ben Youssef, Slim, 2016. "Combustible renewables and waste consumption, agriculture, CO2 emissions and economic growth in Brazil," MPRA Paper 69694, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Dogan, Eyup & Sebri, Maamar & Turkekul, Berna, 2016. "Exploring the relationship between agricultural electricity consumption and output: New evidence from Turkish regional data," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 370-377.
    3. Ben Jebli, Mehdi & Ben Youssef, Slim, 2015. "Renewable Energy Consumption and Agriculture: Evidence for Cointegration and Granger causality for Tunisian Economy," MPRA Paper 68018, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Ben Jebli, Mehdi & Ben Youssef, Slim, 2017. "Investigating the interdependence between non-hydroelectric renewable energy, agricultural value added, and arable land use in Argentina," MPRA Paper 77513, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Stephan B. Bruns, Christian Gross and David I. Stern, 2014. "Is There Really Granger Causality Between Energy Use and Output?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
    6. Lin, Boqiang & Long, Houyin, 2014. "How to promote energy conservation in China’s chemical industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 93-102.
    7. Ben Jebli, Mehdi & Ben Youssef, Slim, 2015. "The role of renewable energy and agriculture in reducing CO2 emissions: evidence for North Africa countries," MPRA Paper 68477, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Ben Jebli, Mehdi & Ben Youssef, Slim, 2017. "Renewable energy, arable land, agriculture, CO2 emissions, and economic growth in Morocco," MPRA Paper 76798, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Sebri, Maamar & Abid, Mehdi, 2012. "Energy use for economic growth: A trivariate analysis from Tunisian agriculture sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 711-716.

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