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Identifying the factors affecting the willingness to pay for fuel-efficient vehicles in Turkey: A case of hybrids

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  • Erdem, Cumhur
  • Sentürk, Ismail
  • Simsek, Türker

Abstract

This paper aims to determine the factors that have an impact on the consumers' willingness to pay a premium for hybrid automobiles in Turkey. A web-based random survey was conducted in different regions of Turkey. A questionnaire was administered to 1983 participants in January-March of 2009. The questionnaire was prepared by taking the issues raised in various sources into account. An ordered Probit model was used to meet the objective. Results show that variables such as income, gender, education, concerns about global warming, number of automobiles, importance of automobile performance, risk preference, attitude toward the alternative energy sources have an impact on the consumers' willingness to pay a premium for hybrids. Findings suggest that consumers who have high income, higher educational level, and concerns about the global warming are more likely to pay a premium for hybrids. This study is expected to make important contributions to the current literature related to the consumers' willingness to pay for hybrids by providing a research study from a developing country's perspective. Results of this study also make important contributions to the policy and decision makers, environmental groups and automotive industry.

Suggested Citation

  • Erdem, Cumhur & Sentürk, Ismail & Simsek, Türker, 2010. "Identifying the factors affecting the willingness to pay for fuel-efficient vehicles in Turkey: A case of hybrids," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 3038-3043, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:6:p:3038-3043
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ewa Zawojska & Anna Bartczak & Mikołaj Czajkowski, 2018. "Disentangling the effects of policy and payment consequentiality and risk attitudes on stated preferences," Working Papers 2018-01, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    2. Chorus, Caspar G. & Koetse, Mark J. & Hoen, Anco, 2013. "Consumer preferences for alternative fuel vehicles: Comparing a utility maximization and a regret minimization model," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 901-908.
    3. Milan Scasny & Milan Scasny & Iva Zverinova & Mikolaj Czajkowski, 2015. "Individual preference for the alternative fuel vehicles and their attributes in Poland," EcoMod2015 8575, EcoMod.
    4. Shanyong Wang & Jin Fan & Dingtao Zhao & Shu Yang & Yuanguang Fu, 2016. "Predicting consumers’ intention to adopt hybrid electric vehicles: using an extended version of the theory of planned behavior model," Transportation, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 123-143, January.
    5. Zhang, Yong & Yu, Yifeng & Zou, Bai, 2011. "Analyzing public awareness and acceptance of alternative fuel vehicles in China: The case of EV," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 7015-7024.
    6. repec:spr:nathaz:v:87:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11069-017-2803-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Saarenpää, Jukka & Kolehmainen, Mikko & Niska, Harri, 2013. "Geodemographic analysis and estimation of early plug-in hybrid electric vehicle adoption," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 456-464.
    8. repec:kap:jcopol:v:40:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10603-017-9361-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Soora Rasouli & Harry Timmermans, 2016. "Influence of Social Networks on Latent Choice of Electric Cars: A Mixed Logit Specification Using Experimental Design Data," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 99-130, March.
    10. Ramos, A. & Gago, A. & Labandeira, X. & Linares, P., 2015. "The role of information for energy efficiency in the residential sector," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(S1), pages 17-29.
    11. Menegaki, Angeliki, N. & Olsen, Søren Bøye & Tsagarakis, Konstantinos P., 2016. "Towards a common standard – A reporting checklist for web-based stated preference valuation surveys and a critique for mode surveys," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 18-50.
    12. Shanyong Wang & Jin Fan & Dingtao Zhao & Shu Yang & Yuanguang Fu, 2016. "Predicting consumers’ intention to adopt hybrid electric vehicles: using an extended version of the theory of planned behavior model," Transportation, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 123-143, January.
    13. Qiu, Yueming & Colson, Gregory & Grebitus, Carola, 2014. "Risk preferences and purchase of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 216-229.
    14. Qiu, Yueming & Colson, Gregory & Wetzstein, Michael E., 2017. "Risk preference and adverse selection for participation in time-of-use electricity pricing programs," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 126-142.
    15. repec:eee:energy:v:130:y:2017:i:c:p:48-54 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Byun, Hyunsuk & Lee, Chul-Yong, 2017. "Analyzing Korean consumers’ latent preferences for electricity generation sources with a hierarchical Bayesian logit model in a discrete choice experiment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 294-302.
    17. Yongyou Nie & Enci Wang & Qinxin Guo & Junyi Shen, 2017. "Examining Shanghai Consumer Preferences for Electric Vehicles and Their Attributes," Discussion Paper Series DP2017-21, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
    18. Zhang, Xian & Wang, Ke & Hao, Yu & Fan, Jing-Li & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2013. "The impact of government policy on preference for NEVs: The evidence from China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, pages 382-393.
    19. Arega, Tiruwork & Tadesse, Tewodros, 2017. "Household willingness to pay for green electricity in urban and peri-urban Tigray, northern Ethiopia: Determinants and welfare effects," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 292-300.
    20. repec:eee:rensus:v:78:y:2017:i:c:p:318-328 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Mukherjee, Deep & Rahman, Mohammad Arshad, 2016. "To drill or not to drill? An econometric analysis of US public opinion," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 341-351.
    22. Fan, Jin & He, Haonan & Wu, Yanrui, 2016. "Personal carbon trading and subsidies for hybrid electric vehicles," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 164-173.
    23. She, Zhen-Yu & Qing Sun, & Ma, Jia-Jun & Xie, Bai-Chen, 2017. "What are the barriers to widespread adoption of battery electric vehicles? A survey of public perception in Tianjin, China," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 29-40.
    24. Zhang Jingchao & Koji Kotani & Tatsuyoshi Saijo, 2017. "Public acceptance of environmentally friendly electric heating in rural Beijing," Working Papers SDES-2017-2, Kochi University of Technology, School of Economics and Management, revised May 2017.
    25. Lin, Boqiang & Tan, Ruipeng, 2017. "Estimation of the environmental values of electric vehicles in Chinese cities," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 221-229.

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    Hybrids WTP Consumers;

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