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Clean technology R&D and innovation in emerging countries--Experience from China

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  • Tan, Xiaomei
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    This paper touches upon two key issues related to clean technology deployment in emerging countries: what is the life cycle of R&D and innovation? And where does the R&D funding come from? The paper holds that the innovation climate, system and process in emerging countries do not follow the same trajectory as those in developed countries. Crafting an innovation model that is adapted to the needs and conditions of emerging countries thus is critical. Through revealing the four phases of an innovation life cycle in emerging countries, the paper highlights the dominant role of the public sector in clean technology R&D. With regards to R&D funding, the paper concludes that emerging countries could craft their domestic policy to spur clean technology R&D and innovation. China's experience demonstrates an array of policy measures that could reach this goal. These include designing a national science and technology strategy with a focus on clean energy, establishing funding programs to support clean energy R&D, assembling and managing multidisciplinary teams to bring together different types of expertise, and creating favorable policy environment to incentivize the private sector's investment in clean technology.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301-4215(10)00031-5
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 38 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 6 (June)
    Pages: 2916-2926

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:6:p:2916-2926
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

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    1. Francesco Caselli & Wilbur John Coleman, 2001. "Cross-Country Technology Diffusion: The Case of Computers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 328-335, May.
    2. World Bank, 2008. "Global Economic Prospects 2008 : Technology Diffusion in the Developing World," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6335, July.
    3. Pavitt, Keith, 1984. "Sectoral patterns of technical change: Towards a taxonomy and a theory," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 343-373, December.
    4. Rosenberg, Nathan, 1990. "Why do firms do basic research (with their own money)?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 165-174, April.
    5. Peter Klenow & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 1997. "The Neoclassical Revival in Growth Economics: Has It Gone Too Far?," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 73-114 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Comin, D. & Hobijn, B., 2004. "Cross-country technology adoption: making the theories face the facts," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 39-83, January.
    7. Linsu Kim & James M. Utterback, 1983. "The Evolution of Organizational Structure and Technology in a Developing Country," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 29(10), pages 1185-1197, October.
    8. Linsu Kim & Youngbae Kim, 1985. "Innovation in a Newly Industrializing Country: A Multiple Discriminant Analysis," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 31(3), pages 312-322, March.
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