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Canada's constitutional separation of (wind) power

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  • Valentine, Scott Victor

Abstract

This paper investigates the impact that a federal government structure has on strategic selection of renewable energy policy instruments. The context for this study centers on wind power development in Canada. Canada is a nation that is blessed by all the attributes necessary to catalyze global leadership in installed wind power capacity. Unfortunately, the constitutional separation of powers that underpins Canada's federal system impedes the creation of a national wind power development strategy because Canada's provinces have constitutional authority over electricity governance. The insights gleaned from the case study are used to develop a conceptual framework for understanding the impact that federal structure has on policy instrument selection and efficacy under areas of federal, regional and concurrent policy jurisdiction. Finally, this framework is re-applied to identify specific approaches the Canadian federal government could take to resolve what currently amounts to be a fragmented, ineffective approach to wind power development planning.

Suggested Citation

  • Valentine, Scott Victor, 2010. "Canada's constitutional separation of (wind) power," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 1918-1930, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:4:p:1918-1930
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Valentine, Scott Victor, 2010. "A STEP toward understanding wind power development policy barriers in advanced economies," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 14(9), pages 2796-2807, December.
    2. Valentine, Scott Victor, 2011. "Understanding the variability of wind power costs," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(8), pages 3632-3639.
    3. Olateju, Babatunde & Kumar, Amit, 2011. "Hydrogen production from wind energy in Western Canada for upgrading bitumen from oil sands," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 6326-6339.
    4. Iglesias, Guillermo & del Río, Pablo & Dopico, Jesús Ángel, 2011. "Policy analysis of authorisation procedures for wind energy deployment in Spain," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 4067-4076, July.
    5. Valentine, Scott Victor, 2011. "Emerging symbiosis: Renewable energy and energy security," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(9), pages 4572-4578.
    6. Fertel, Camille & Bahn, Olivier & Vaillancourt, Kathleen & Waaub, Jean-Philippe, 2013. "Canadian energy and climate policies: A SWOT analysis in search of federal/provincial coherence," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 1139-1150.
    7. Watson, Ian & Betts, Stephen & Rapaport, Eric, 2012. "Determining appropriate wind turbine setback distances: Perspectives from municipal planners in the Canadian provinces of Nova Scotia, Ontario, and Quebec," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 782-789.
    8. Ferguson-Martin, Christopher J. & Hill, Stephen D., 2011. "Accounting for variation in wind deployment between Canadian provinces," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 1647-1658, March.

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